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Best Spin Bike Review – Top 10 Fittest List

Last modified on August 30th, 2022 at 4:50 am
Best Spin Bike Review – Top 10 Fittest List
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Best Spin Bike Review – Top 9 Fittest List for November, 2022

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Best Spin Bike Review – Top 10 Fittest List
  • MSRP: Price not available
  • Dimensions: 44 x 38 x 11 inches
  • Weight: 112 pounds
  • Drive Train and Resistance: Carbon Blue belt drive (chain drive available), magnetic resistance
  • Q Factor: 170 mm (6 11/16 inches)
  • Maximum User Weight: 350 pounds
Our Rating: 9.4
VIEW LATEST PRICE →
Best Spin Bike Review – Top 10 Fittest List
  • MSRP: $213.23
  • Dimensions: 43 x 46 x 20 inches
  • Weight: 78 pounds
  • Drive Train and Resistance: Chain and felt wool pad that sits on top of the flywheel
  • Q Factor: 206 mm (8 1/8 inches)
  • Maximum User Weight: 220 pounds
Our Rating: 9.2
VIEW LATEST PRICE →
Best Spin Bike Review – Top 10 Fittest List
  • MSRP: Price not available
  • Dimensions: 55 x 23 x 39 inches
  • Weight: 111 pounds
  • Drive Train and Resistance: Multi-ribbed belt drive, magnetic resistance
  • Q Factor: 170mm
  • Maximum User Weight: 300 pounds
Our Rating: 9.1
VIEW LATEST PRICE →
Best Spin Bike Review – Top 10 Fittest List
  • Warranty: 10 years on frame, 2 years on mechanical parts, 1 year on labor
  • Dimensions: 44 x 38 x 11 inches
  • Weight: 112 pounds
  • Drive Train and Resistance: Carbon Blue belt drive (chain drive available), magnetic resistance
  • Q Factor: 170 mm (6 11/16 inches)
  • Maximum User Weight: 350 pounds
VIEW LATEST PRICE →
Best Spin Bike Review – Top 10 Fittest List
  • Warranty: Five years on frame and brakes, three years on electronics and parts
  • Dimensions: 46 x 42 x 23 inches
  • Weight: 126 pounds
  • Drive Train and Resistance: Belt and magnetic resistance (510Ic model needs to be plugged)
  • Q Factor: 185 mm (6 1/4 inches)
  • Maximum User Weight: 300 pounds
VIEW LATEST PRICE →
Best Spin Bike Review – Top 10 Fittest List
  • Warranty: One year
  • Dimensions: 42 x 42 x 24 inches
  • Weight: 113 pounds
  • Drive Train and Resistance: Chain and two pads that are on the side of the flywheel
  • Q Factor: unknown
  • Maximum User Weight: 275 pounds
VIEW LATEST PRICE →
Best Spin Bike Review – Top 10 Fittest List
  • Warranty: 90 days
  • Dimensions: 43 x 46 x 20 inches
  • Weight: 78 pounds
  • Drive Train and Resistance: Chain and felt wool pad that sits on top of the flywheel
  • Q Factor: 206 mm (8 1/8 inches)
  • Maximum User Weight: 220 pounds
VIEW LATEST PRICE →
Best Spin Bike Review – Top 10 Fittest List
  • Warranty: Lifetime on frame, 3 years on parts and electronics, 1 year on labor
  • Dimensions: 40 x 42 x 21 inches
  • Weight: 141 pounds
  • Drive Train and Resistance: Belt-driven, magnetic resistance
  • Q-factor: 203 mm (8 inches)
  • Maximum User Weight: 300 pounds
VIEW LATEST PRICE →
Best Spin Bike Review – Top 10 Fittest List
  • Warranty: Lifetime on frame, 5 years on parts, 2 years on labor
  • Dimensions: 52 x 47 x 22 inches
  • Weight: 127 pounds
  • Drive Train and Resistance: Belt-driven, magnetic resistance
  • Q-factor: 175 mm (6.88 inches)
  • Maximum User Weight: 350 pounds
VIEW LATEST PRICE →
Best Spin Bike Review – Top 10 Fittest List
  • Warranty: One year, no warranty on labor
  • Dimensions: 48 x 42 x 18 inches
  • Weight: 100 pounds
  • Drive Train and Resistance: chain, adjustable resistance with quick-stop
  • Q Factor: 147 mm (5 3/4 inches)
  • Maximum User Weight: 250 pounds
VIEW LATEST PRICE →

Indoor bikes have been around for nearly 100 years. In fact, the “Exercycle” was a state-of-the-art piece of equipment in the mid 1900s, even though comparing it to today’s spin bikes is like comparing a smart phone to two tin cans connected by a piece of string.

The top 8 best spin bikes? The exercycle wouldn’t make a modern top 7000 of any type of indoor bicycle.

Keep reading just below to find out which spin bikes make it onto Groom+Styles’s top 8 list.

Today, indoor bikes and spinning classes dominate gyms and fitness centers.

The allure of a quick workout in the comfort of your home on a stationary bike, though, is just as great now as it was back then. However, now we have more advanced equipment to do it with, making it simpler than ever to get in a terrific cardio workout without having to waste an hour or more getting to and from the gym.

One important note: when you go to the drugstore, you don’t say “I need some facial tissue.” You say “I want to buy some Kleenex,” even if you plan on buying the cheapest tissue in the store. That’s because the brand name “Kleenex” has become synonymous with facial tissue. It’s the same thing with spin bikes. Most people now use that term, or simply the word “spinning,” to refer to indoor bikes and biking. However, those are actually copyrighted terms owned by the company, Mad Dogg Athletics, whose Spinning bikes have made indoor cycling so popular that everyone simply uses their name instead of the more generic phrase “indoor bike.”

We’ll try to use the term “Spin” for that company’s products wherever possible.

Here is the best spin bike (indoor) list as reviewed by Groom+Style – let’s go for a spin.

 

1. Keiser M3/M3 Plus/M3i/M3iX Plus Indoor Cycle

Best Spin Bike - Keiser M3 Plus Indoor Cycle
Keiser M3 Plus Indoor Cycle.

Mad Dogg may own the brand name in spin bikes, but the Keiser M3i Plus is the true Rolls-Royce of indoor cycling. It’s sturdy, it’s high-end gym quality, it has a beautifully minimalist look – and it gives you a workout, unlike any spin bike you’ve ever tried.

The real key to this machine’s excellence is its groundbreaking Eddy Current magnetic resistance system, which the company spent ten years developing. Without getting into boring detail, the design gives you 24 full gears of eerily-quiet, realistic biking ranging from easygoing to grueling, in the comfort of your bedroom or basement.

And the bike almost never needs maintenance, because the moving parts in the drive system never touch each other; when you change gears, the flywheel simply moves closer to (or further from) the magnetic field.  The flywheel is also positioned at the back of the bike which ensures that sweat does not fall in causing damage.

Keiser M3 Plus Indoor Cycle - bike from side
The beautifully finished Keiser M3 Plus Indoor Cycle – fully adjustable with its exceptionally designed rear flywheel.

The Keiser M3i Plus is exceptional for any type of indoor work but is at its best during a full-blown workout, as the ability to cycle with maximum resistance is great for cardio health and optimal for fat burning and muscle strength. The 24 gears also let you gradually increase or decrease the intensity of your session, making cool-down a breeze.

There are also more fully adjustable features on the M3i Plus, including the seat, fore and aft handlebars and Shimano Combo pedals than any other indoor spin bike. The onboard LCD display shows most of the data you’d expect; the only thing it’s missing is the type of pre-programmed options you find on upright stationary bikes (and the Diamondback Fitness 510Ic, which we’ll get to shortly).

Keiser M3 Plus Indoor Cycle - computer and handlebars
The Keiser handlebar design is arguably simplistic but does have all the positions you will need. The computer shows RPM, Power, Heart Rate, Time, Resistance/Gear and Distance.

The Keiser spin bikes do have one of the lightest flywheels on the market at about 8 lbs.  There are some people who suggest that having a lighter flywheel can be a disadvantage.  Groom+Style discusses the reason why we believe this is not an issue when it comes to the Keiser range of bikes, in the following article: Spin Bike Flywheel Weight – Is a Heavier Flywheel Better On an Exercise Bike?

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If however, you are still interested in a bike with a heavier flywheel, then you should consider an alternative like the Diamondback fitness (32 lbs flywheel), the Spinner NXT (41 lbs flywheel) or the Schwinn AC Performance Plus (37 lbs flywheel).

If you’re on a budget, then this is not the bike for you because it is one of the most expensive spin bikes on the market. However, if you have the coin, it is a brilliant indoor spin bike for home use.

Please note – If you want to save some money you could buy the M3 Plus.  The key difference is that the M3i Plus has:

  • an improved console so you can pair the “bike” with your mobile device (and a free app) via Bluetooth to record your workout.
  • media tray for your table
  • preset holes in the seat adjustment which are there as a safety measure.  You can tighten the seat in-between the preset holes and if the seat does happen to slip it will then catch on the next preset.
  • in the latest M3i Plus bike you get advanced butterfly style handlebars

A look at the specs of the Keiser M3i Plus Indoor Cycle:

  • Dimensions: 49 x 45 x 26 inches
  • Maximum User Weight: 300 pounds
  • Weight: 140 pounds
  • Drive Train and resistance: Poly-V belt and Eddy Current magnetic resistance
  • Warranty: 10 years on frame, three years on parts
  • Minimum and Maximum Height for the end user – between 4’10” and 6’5″
  • Q Factor: 197 mm (7 3/4 inches)
  • M3 Plus/M3i Adjustability: seat and handlebars can be adjusted vertically and horizontally.
    • Note: on the original Keiser M3 the handlebars do not have a horizontal adjustment.  On the M3 the stem is angled forward so moving the adjustment up also moves the handlebars forward (conversely moving the handlebar stem down moves the handlebar backward ).  At both extremes (lowest position and longest position) this can potentially create some fitting difficulties for smaller people or larger people.

Check Keiser M3i Plus Price on Amazon

You can also investigate Keiser’s latest model the Keiser M3iX which comes equipped with X-bars. X-bars are effectively handlebars that move from side to side (7 levels of resistance).

The independent lower body and upper body movement offer an additional core and upper body workout.  The Groom+Style team did enjoy the feel of the X-bars, and if you can afford it, think the added variety you get from the X-bars is well worth it.

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Check Keiser M3iX Price on Amazon

 

2. Schwinn Fitness AC Performance Plus

best spin bike - Schwinn Fitness AC PERFORMANCE PLUS
Schwinn AC Performance Plus.

In the same price range as the Keiser, this Schwinn has a substantially heavier, perimeter-weighted flywheel (37 pounds vs. the 8-pound flywheel on the Keiser).  As we’ve mentioned, the Groom+Style team prefers a lighter flywheel because it provides a more comfortable ride without being overly-aggressive or putting too much strain on the knees. Many serious cyclists disagree, however, preferring the high resistance of a heavy flywheel. For those folks, the Schwinn Fitness AC Performance Plus is a perfect choice.

The flywheel may be heavy but the bike is lighter than you’d expect because the frame is made from aluminum rather than steel, making it rustproof as well.

Schwinn Fitness AC PERFORMANCE PLUS with CARBON BLUE Belt Drive - Indoor Cycling Bike - full bike
Solidly built and virtually maintenance free, the Schwinn has a large following of dedicated fans among serious cyclists.

A terrific six-magnet braking system distributes this spin bike’s braking power, and a new Carbon Blue belt drive with soft nylon teeth (which has superseded the old Schwinn chain drive, although chain drive models are still available) makes the ride smoother and quieter than we expected. The belt is virtually maintenance-free and should last for years, due to its polyurethane construction and carbon fiber core.

[youtube id=”mGNMRqjSMMc” width=”750″ height=”340″ position=”left”]

ErgoLoop performance handlebars, aero bars, and double-link pedals (compatible with Shimano SPD clips) add to the great performance of this high-end Schwinn spin bike, and it is built exceptionally well (this is not surprising, considering the company’s heritage).

Schwinn Fitness AC PERFORMANCE PLUS with CARBON BLUE Belt Drive - Indoor Cycling Bike - computer and handle bars
The Schwinn ErgoLoop performance handlebars with the Echelon console attached (console shows Power, RPM, Speed, Calories, Gear/resistance, and various stage measurements).

The only downside is that the AC Performance Plus doesn’t come with an onboard monitor/computer, which you might expect on modern bikes; you’ll have to spend another two hundred dollars for the MPower Echelon console (or even more for the Echelon 2 with power upgrade).

Groom+Style prefers spin bikes with lighter flywheels, but if you’re on the other side of that argument this Schwinn AC bike is about as good as it gets.

Looking deeper at the Schwinn Fitness AC Performance Plus:

  • Dimensions: 44 x 38 x 11 inches
  • Maximum user weight: 350 pounds
  • Weight: 112 pounds
  • Drive Train and resistance: Carbon Blue belt drive (chain drive available), magnetic resistance
  • Warranty: 10 years on frame, 2 years on mechanical parts, 1 year on labor
  • Minimum and maximum height for the end user: Between 4’11” and 6’8″
  • Q Factor: 170 mm (6 11/16 inches)
  • Adjustability: Handlebars and seat, multiple positions

Check Schwinn Fitness AC Performance Plus Price on Amazon

 

3. Diamondback Fitness 510Ic Indoor Cycle

Best Spin Bike - Diamondback Fitness 510Ic Indoor Cycle
Diamondback Fitness 510Ic Indoor Cycle.

With almost all of the features of the Keiser except for its very smooth belt drive system, the Diamondback Fitness 510Ic is a terrific spin bike for less than half the price.

This is a heavy indoor cycle with durability to match; the belt-driven/flywheel system works extremely well to give you the different varieties of workouts most people want from a spinner since you can select between 16 levels of computer-controlled resistance. The ride is even quieter than you’d normally expect with a chain drive, and there are full fore/aft handlebar and seat adjustments possible for riding comfort.

One of the standout features of the 510Ic is the computerized integration between its operation and the monitor mounted on the bike. It gives you a ton of real-time information about your ride and fitness (including four heart rate functions) and also has 14 different automated workouts programmed into the system, much like you’d find on an upright model but unusual on spinners.

On top of Groom+Style’s recommendation, Consumer Reports has given the Diamondback Fitness 510IC a “Best Buy” designation, and it’s easy to see why. It may not be quite the bike that the Keiser is but for the price, but it might be exactly what you are after.

If you want to spend a bit more you could opt for the Diamondback Fitness 910IC which has:

  • 32 levels of resistance, as opposed to 16 on the 510Ic
  • Bike generates its own power, as opposed to the 510Ic which is AC powered
  • An integrated heart rate receiver i.e. you need to purchase a heart rate monitor like the Polar Heart monitor, which the 910Ic will display

Key specifications for the Diamondback Fitness 510Ic Indoor Cycle:

  • Dimensions: 46 x 42 x 23 inches
  • Maximum User Weight: 300 pounds
  • Weight: 126 pounds
  • Drive Train and resistance: Belt and magnetic resistance (510Ic model needs to be plugged)
  • Warranty: Five years on frame and brakes, three years on electronics and parts
  • Minimum and Maximum Height for the end user – between 5’2″ and 6’5″
  • Q Factor: 185 mm (6 1/4 inches)
  • Adjustability: seat and handlebars can be adjusted vertically and horizontally

Check Diamondback Fitness 510Ic Price on Amazon

 

4. Life Fitness Lifecycle GX Group Exercise Bike

Life Fitness Lifecycle GX Group Exercise Bike with Console

This is indeed a terrific spinner for group classes, but there’s no reason you can’t buy one of these beauties for solo use at home. In fact, when you compare it side-by-side with some of Groom+Style’s other top choices, it gives them a run for their money at a few hundred dollars less. And the review team thinks the Lifecycle GX may be the best of the bunch for endurance training. (It’s the best looking, too.)

The build and design of this Life Fitness spin bike is excellent, with the rear-mounted flywheel powered by magnetic resistance (20 selectable levels controlled by a lever located below the handlebars) and multi-ribbed belt drive. That makes the ride very smooth and extremely quiet, and the machine virtually maintenance-free. The rubberized handlebar grip is relatively comfortable whether you want to ride with your hands at the ends, in the middle or in between. The fully-adjustable seat has a cutout to allow for extra air flow, and the dual-sided pedals accommodate SPD clips.

The GX Group Exercise Bike is a bit on the heavy side but it’s easy enough to move around, thanks to a pair of transport wheels on the front. And with a rust-proof welded steel frame, this baby should be around for a long, long time.

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The only things missing from the GX are accessories. The LCD console is fine and it will display all of the metrics you’d want to see (except watts), but there’s no full-featured computer or touch-screen monitor, no preset programs, no connectivity options, and not even a device holder (unless your device will fit into one of the water bottle holders).

LifeFitness IC6 Indoor Cycling Bike with MyRide Console

If you want those goodies plus a 155mm Q-factor (it’s 170mm on the base GX), the Life Fitness IC6 with MyRide console is worth a long look – link to Amazon below.

The Lifecycle GS doesn’t provide a ride that fully simulates that of a road bike – but that’s not what it’s built to do. It’s a great spinning bike that’s perfect for serious athletes, delivering a terrific workout with full control and a smooth, noise-free ride.

Looking further at the Life Fitness Lifecycle GX Group Exercise Bike:

  • Dimensions: 55 x 23 x 39 inches
  • Maximum User Weight: 300 pounds
  • Weight: 111 pounds
  • Drivetrain and resistance: Multi-ribbed belt drive, magnetic resistance
  • Minimum/maximum height for the end user: between 4’10” and 6’4”
  • Warranty: Five years on frame, three years on mechanical components, one year on console and pedals
  • Q-factor: 170mm
  • Adjustability: Seat and handlebars can be adjusted horizontally and horizontally

Check Life Fitness Lifecycle GX Group Bike Price on Amazon

Check LifeFitness IC6 Indoor Cycling Bike with MyRide Console Price on Amazon

 

5. Sunny Health and Fitness SF-B1805 Indoor Cycling Bike

Sunny Health & Fitness Magnetic Belt Drive Indoor Cycling Bike with 44 lb Flywheel and Large Device Holder, Black, Model Number: SF-B1805

Note: The Sunny Health and Fitness SF-B1709 model has dropped in price recently and is worth considering (in addition to or instead of the 1805).  It has a design similar to the Keiser with a lighter rear positioned flywheel – and it also comes with a computer (we have included a link to it below in case you want to investigate it further).

Sunny Health makes a lot of good-quality budget fitness products (see the G+S review of the Sunny SF-B1001 a few notches below this review, for example). The review team wouldn’t exactly categorize the SF-B1805 as a “budget” spin bike, since its price is a bit closer to the models at the top of this list than the bottom. What we will say, though, is that it’s a very good value choice.

This is a magnetic-resistance, belt-driven bike with a strong steel frame and a heavy-duty, 44 pound flywheel that delivers a smooth and quiet ride. Resistance can be gradually increased or decreased while you’re riding, with the knob that’s built onto the frame. The one drawback with the knob, however, is that you can’t actually assign a number to how much resistance you’re experiencing. The seat and handlebars can be adjusted through four different positions, and there are steel toe-cage pedals with adjustable straps.

You have to give up something when you’re paying a lower price for performance, and this Sunny model doesn’t include a console/monitor system. Instead, there is a tablet holder which will accommodate an iPad, so you can connect to your fitness app of choice and attach your own monitors (or listen to music, if you’d rather). The SF-B1805 has the usual safety and convenience features like floor levelers, emergency brake, water bottle holder and transportation wheels.

Sunny’s SF-B1805 is a good midrange choice for those who don’t care about high-end features, but care greatly about having a stable, durable, magnetic resistance, belt driven bike of a high quality.

Specifications for the Sunny Health and Fitness SF-B1805 Indoor Cycling Bike:

  • Dimensions: 48 x 23 x 45 inches
  • Maximum User Weight: 300 pounds
  • Weight: 126 pounds
  • Drive Train and Resistance: Belt, adjustable magnetic resistance with quick stop
  • Warranty: Three years on frame, six months on other parts
  • Minimum/Maximum height for the end user: Inseam between 28-38 inches
  • Q Factor: 182
  • Adjustability: 4 adjustments on seat, handlebars

Check Sunny Health and Fitness SF-B1805 Price on Amazon

Check Sunny Health and Fitness SF-B1709 Price on Amazon

 

6. Phoenix 98623 Revolution Cycle Pro II Exercise Bike

Best Spin Bike - Phoenix 98623 Revolution Cycle
Phoenix 98623 Revolution Cycle.

The key to a good spinner is the quality of the workout, not the bells and whistles. That’s why the Phoenix 98623 makes our list; it doesn’t have some of the features you’ll find on higher-priced exercise bikes, but it’s a small, heavy and strong machine which will let you get your cardio and calorie-burning exercise in with the same realistic feel as a road bike.

The Revolution features a quiet chain-and-flywheel system with the amount of resistance regulated by a braking system operated by a knob on the frame. One downside is that the system uses two brake pads, instead of just one as is common with most chain-style spin bikes, so it’s possible for the pads to get out of alignment and require adjustment or replacement.

Two unusual positive twists, though, are that the 98623 has an “emergency brake” lever which stops the flywheel immediately if necessary, and it also allows you to pedal both backward and forward.

This unit has an adjustable seat and handlebars, although the handlebars only move up and down and not horizontally, unlike fully-adjustable competitors. You’d probably expect that at this lower price point the bike would not have a monitor console, and you’d be right.

Bells and whistles cost more – and this spinner costs less. For most people, that’s a tradeoff worth making.

Looking a little more closely at the Phoenix 98623 Revolution Cycle Pro II Exercise Bike:

  • Dimensions: 42 x 42 x 24 inches
  • Maximum User Weight: 275 pounds
  • Weight: 113 pounds
  • Drive Train and resistance: Chain and two pads that are on the side of the flywheel
  • Warranty: One year
  • Minimum and Maximum Height for the end user – between 5’2″ and 6’2″
  • Q Factor: unknown
  • Adjustability: seat can be adjusted vertically and horizontally and the handlebar can be adjusted vertically

Check Phoenix 98623 Price on Amazon

 

7. Sunny SF-B1001 Indoor Cycling Bike

Best Spin Bike - Sunny SF-B1001 Indoor Cycling Bike
Sunny SF-B1001 Indoor Cycling Bike.

Extremely affordable and functional, the Sunny SF-B1001 is a great choice as an entry spin bike. This small unit (best suited to riders under 6-2) is quite study thanks to its steel skeleton, and provides a good range of resistance because of its chain drive system; as with most of these types of spinners, the resistance is controlled with an adjustable knob on the frame.

The Sunny is a bit noisier than the other bikes on our list, but it’s not really loud enough to be intrusive as you’re riding.

There aren’t as many comfort adjustments as you’ll find on more expensive competitors, with the handlebars only moving up and down, the pedals (which can, of course, be changed out for standard ones) only featuring toe straps, and the seat (which is not very comfortable, so you may want to replace or pad it) only adjustable over a relatively short range. There is also no console providing feedback on distance, speed or heart rate.

The cost overrides any negatives you might find on this bike. If you’re looking for your first indoor exercise bike to be strong and provide a good workout – the Sunny is a very strong contender.

Specs for the Sunny SF-B1001 Indoor Cycling Bike:

  • Dimensions: 43 x 46 x 20 inches
  • Maximum User Weight: 220 pounds
  • Weight: 78 pounds
  • Drive Train and resistance: Chain and felt wool pad that sits on top of the flywheel
  • Warranty: 90 days
  • Minimum and Maximum Height for the end user – between 5′ and 6′
  • Q Factor: 206 mm (8 1/8 inches)
  • Adjustability: seat can be adjusted vertically and horizontally and the handlebar can be adjusted vertically

Check Sunny SF-B1001S Price on Amazon

 

8. Sole Fitness SB900

SOLE Fitness SB900 Light Upright Indoor Stationary Bike, Home and Gym Exercise Equipment, Smooth and Quiet, Versatile for Any Workout, Bluetooth and USB Compatible

The SB900 isn’t cheap, but it’s much less expensive than the models that top the Groom+Style rankings. And it’s definitely worth its price.

This Sole Fitness model is a very quiet, magnetic resistance indoor exercise bike with a 40-pound flywheel. A heavy flywheel simulates the smoother ride and natural feel of riding an outdoor bicycle, although many riders (including those at G+S) have gravitated toward lighter flywheels like the 8-pounder on the Keiser M3 which spin faster because they lessen pressure on the knees and give muscles a better workout. Conventional wisdom still favors heavier flywheels like the 37-pounder on the Schwinn Fitness AC, though, and they are definitely a good choice for competitive bikers.

It’s not just the SB900’s flywheel that tips the scales with big numbers. Its frame is made from aluminum-shrouded steel, rather than all aluminum, which makes the bike quite heavy; you won’t be moving this baby around easily. However, the weight makes this Sole model an extremely durable spinner which will stand up to heavy use. You have the option of toe clips or SPD pedals, the ergonomically-designed handlebars and performance racing saddle are both adjustable, and transitions between the many levels of eddy-current tension (gradually adjusted with a turn-knob) are whisper-quiet.

One downside for some users, though, is that there are no preset workout programs. The relatively small monitor shows the most important numbers like distance, speed, time, RPM, Kcal and pulse, and it’s compatible with a chest strap heart monitor (strap not included). It also doesn’t have speakers or WiFi/Bluetooth capability.

Sole Fitness’s SB900 is a less-expensive, well-built option for riders who want an indoor bike with a heavy flywheel, although its lack of pre-set programs may scare off those who want all of the bells and whistles.

Checking the specifications of the Sole Fitness SB900:

  • Dimensions: 40 x 42 x 21 inches
  • Maximum User Weight: 300 pounds
  • Weight: 141 pounds
  • Drive Train and resistance: Belt-driven, magnetic resistance
  • Minimum/Maximum height for the end user: between 5’0 and 6’2”
  • Warranty: Lifetime on frame, 3 years on parts and electronics, 1 year on labor
  • Q-factor: 203 mm (8 inches)
  • Adjustability: Seat and handlebars can be adjusted both vertically and horizontally

Check Sole Fitness SB900 Price on Amazon

As of the time of the most recent update, the Sole Fitness SB900 was found to be out of stock. If you are looking for a reasonable substitute, we highly recommend you take a look at these options on Amazon.

9. Bodycraft SPR Indoor Group Cycle

BODYCRAFT SPR Club Indoor Group Training Cycle

If the Keiser sounds like the ideal spin bike to you – except for its exceptionally-light flywheel – you’ll want to check out the Bodycraft SPR, which is quite similar in all other important respects.

They both feature belt drive and eddy-current magnetic resistance which can be easily adjusted via lever, painted steel frames, fully-adjustable (vertical and horizontal) handlebars and seats, flywheels which are ideally situated behind the seat instead of in front of it, and basic consoles that show all important metrics but don’t have pre-set programs or Bluetooth connectivity.  You’ll also need to buy a separate heart rate strap, too.

The major differences (other than the flywheel) are small ones, such as the Keiser’s 24 levels of resistance compared to 16 resistance levels on the Bodycraft, and the fact that the SPR’s pedals only come with toe straps (SPD pedals can be added for an extra charge).

This indoor bike provides an extremely smooth ride, the “infinite-adjustability” handlebars with multiple positions (including drop-down racing positions), and high-performance racing saddle makes the Bodycraft perfect for just about any body type or biking style. The construction is first-rate, with oversized industrial bearings and cold-forged steel cranks.

Bodycraft also has two slightly lower-end models which you can compare via the links below.

The Bodycraft SPR is an outstanding indoor bike, without consumer-style bells and whistles, that would fit perfectly in a gym as well as a home. It’s slightly less expensive than the Keiser (and looks a little cooler), but the real differentiation is its much larger flywheel.

More info on the Bodycraft SPR Indoor Group Cycle:

  • Dimensions: 52 x 47 x 22 inches
  • Maximum User Weight: 350 pounds
  • Weight: 127 pounds
  • Drive Train and resistance: Belt-driven, magnetic resistance
  • Minimum/Maximum height for the end user: between 5’0 and 6’6”
  • Warranty: Lifetime on frame, 5 years on parts, 2 years on labor
  • Q-factor: 175 mm (6.88 inches)
  • Adjustability: Seat and handlebars can be adjusted both vertically and horizontally

Check Bodycraft SPR Indoor Group Cycle Price on Amazon

Check Bodycraft SPT Magnetic Group Cycle Price on Amazon

Check Bodycraft SPX Club Cycle Price on Amazon

Unfortunately, as the the time of this update, the Bodycraft SPR Indoor Group Cycle is out of stock. To find a reasonable alternative that will meet your needs just as well, we recommend that you check out these options on Amazon.

 

10. Spinner L7 Spin Lifestyle Series Indoor Cycling Bike

Spinner L7 Spin Lifestyle Series Indoor Cycling Bike

We replaced this Spinner L7 model with the better value Sunny Health and Fitness SF-B1805 bike.

Ah, here it is – a true spin bike, made by the company (Madd Dogg Athletics) that popularized (and trademarked) the term Spinner. Over the last 25 years, their products have been sold under the names Madd Dogg, Spinner and Star Trak, so it’s hard to keep up at times. Their products, however, have always been extremely high-quality and durable, well-worth their price. This Spinner bike upholds the Madd Dogg tradition at a surprisingly reasonable price.

One of our long-time favorites has been the now-discontinued Spinner NXT (which can still be found if you look hard enough, as can the old Sprint and Blade models – links below), but the company has come out with a new range of bikes (Lifestyle, Active, Performance and Commercial Series). It offers the same Spinner high quality and attention to detail you’d see in one of their performance or commercial spin bikes, at much lower prices. The Spinner L7 is a perfect example.

The L7 has a compact all-steel powder-coated frame, a terrific 36-pound perimeter-weighted flywheel and drive chain, umbrella-style resistance adjustment knob, and commercial-style leather brake pad. It also has all sorts of features you’d never expect to find on a sub-$1000 exercise bike: dual-sided SPD-compatible pedals, fore and aft incremental seat adjustments, and handlebars with micro-adjustment capability with a center section big enough to hold a large mobile device.

This bike is lighter than most Spinners and easy to move, too, although it’s not built for riders taller than 6’ tall. It’s positioned at the high end of the company’s “beginner” line, but it’s more like the exercise bike you’d find in a gym.

In short, the ride is smooth and comfortable, providing a true road bike feel – much more than you’d ever expect when looking at the price tag. The L7 fully earns the brand name Spinner, and it’s a winner.

When looking for a home spin bike with a combination of high-quality, smooth ride and easy-to-take price, there’s no reason to look further than the Spinner L7 spin bike.

Specifications for the Spinner L7 Spin Lifestyle Series Indoor Cycling Bike:

  • Dimensions: 48 x 42 x 18 inches
  • Maximum User Weight: 250 pounds
  • Weight: 100 pounds
  • Drive Train and resistance: chain, adjustable resistance with quick-stop
  • Warranty: One year, no warranty on labor
  • Minimum/Maximum height for the end user: between 4’10 and 6’0”
  • Q Factor: 147 mm (5 3/4 inches)
  • Adjustability: Fore/aft adjustment on the seat, micro adjustments on handlebars

Check Spinner L7 Spin Lifestyle Series Bike Price on Amazon

Links to older generation bikes:

Check Spinner NXT Price on Amazon (steel frame and 41 lbs flywheel)

Check Spinner Sprint Price on Amazon (steel frame and 43 lbs flywheel)

Check Spinner Blade Price on Amazon (aluminum frame and 46 lbs flywheel)

 

Still haven’t exactly found what you are looking for, maybe a Recumbent Exercise Bike is more your style?  Also, don’t forget that even if your goal is just to increase your fitness and not just lose weight, an increase in the amount of fruit and vegetables in your diet is going to help you achieve your goals faster!

If you are looking for some options to add some excitement to your indoor cycling workouts then check out our article – Peloton Spin Bike Alternatives.

Author

  • Pierce Lane

    How does Pierce Lane get such a close shave? He leaves those secrets on our posts here on G+S. Whether it’s grooming, hair care, or fashion, Pierce knows what he’s doing when it comes to maintaining a good presence and image while feeling your most confident self. We snagged him up after seeing his social media contributions that discussed how exercise can change your life, why it’s important to feel your best, and other interesting points of views that really hit home.

163 thoughts on “Best Spin Bike Review – Top 10 Fittest List”

  1. Great info. Any comments on the L9 spinner? Does it require a lot of maintenance and can the handlebars’ height be sufficiently adjusted? I’m 5’2” with lower back issues so I need to adjust the handlebars higher than the seat. Thanks!

    Reply
  2. Great in-depth article!
    It’s always a tricky one, deciding on buying a spin bike for home, as they inevitably take up space so you have to be sure you are going to make good use of it. But if you have the space and love to spin – go for it!

    Reply
  3. Thanks very much for all the info- learning a lot about indoor bikes, but have many more questions now-
    1) Are you familiar with the Matrix ic7 or the Matrix CXM? They are supposed to be top of the line bikes, but no mention of them?

    2) I also see Life Fitness makes an ic7? Is Matrix owned by Life Fitness or are they co-branding?

    Reply
  4. You mentioned the the B1709 would be better than the B1805; however, I dont see the B1709 on the list. Please advise. I am in search of purchasing a bike as well and in the price range of 5-600. Do ies the B1805 have a computer for speed, or a tablet screen?

    Reply
    • Hi Nad,

      Thanks for the question.

      The price of the Sunny Health and Fitness SF-B1709 seems to have dropped recently to the point where it is now similar to the SF-B1805 (it used to be at least $250 more expensive).

      As the price of the SF-B1709 has dropped we have started to pay more attention to it, as it certainly seems to be great value, especially as you have pointed out it comes with a computer which measures, speed (average and max) cadence (average and max), distance (total and target), calories and time (race and target).

      So yes, if you can find the SF-B1709, at your preferred retailer, for under US$600 we would snap it up… 🙂

      Hope this helps.

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
      • After reviewing I noticed jt doesn’t have a space to put the tablet and if does I read that it awkwardly sits in front of the computer. Is this true? I would like to place the tablet so I can follow a program on the screen. Any suggestions?

        Reply
        • Hi Nad,

          You are absolutely correct the SF-B1709 does not have a nice space to place a tablet. If you were going to invest in this model bike, and wanted to use a tablet you would need to purchase a separate tablet stand.

          You could go for a holder that connects to your bike, or a stand that sits on the ground. Each have their pros and cons.

          Link to example bike connected tablet holder. Keeps things together, and more compact, but if you are standing and riding hard might vibrate a bit.
          https://geni.us/tableholder

          Link to example table floor stand. Might not look as good in your living/training space, but will ensure there is not vibration when you are training.
          https://geni.us/tabletstandfloor

          Hope this helps.

          Kind Regards,
          Pierce

          Reply
          • Is there another bike you can recommend that has both or do you think it’s best to get this and the connector for the tablet? I am assuming that having a tablet in front is important if I’m going to have the bike at home.

          • Hi Nad,

            It is very common to buy a separate connector for a tablet or mobile device, so I would not be put off by this.

            I think if you have found a bike that ticks most of your requirements (and the SF-B1709 is a great product) I would not be put off by the fact that you need a separate connector.

            Let us know how things go…

            Kind Regards,
            Pierce

          • Hi Nad,

            It is an amazing bike, and service they provide.

            Whether it is worth it, is a very personal decision. It is a bit like asking someone who has bought a luxury mechanical watch whether it is worth it i.e. a five dollar watch can still tell the time, but you are paying for a lot more than the function i.e. things such as bragging rights, the joy of owning a premium product etc.

            You can also use the Peloton service without actually buying their bike i.e. any spin bike can be setup to be used with the Peloton service…just read the article linked below.

            https://groomandstyle.com/peloton-spin-bike-alternatives/

            Kind Regards,
            Pierce

      • Just keep in mind, the Q factor on the 1709 is wider than the 1805. So, it may pay to try one in a store, if that’s possible.

        Reply
    • Hi Sue,

      Thanks a lot.

      Yes, the handlebars (and seat) on the Sunny B1709 adjust forward and backwards (as well as up and down).

      Hope this helps.

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
  5. This a great article and even better discussion. I’m intrigued by the Diamonback but my local sporting goods store has the Cascade CMX Pro. Have you studied that?

    Reply
    • Hiya,

      Unfortunately no member of our team has tried the Cascade bikes, but based on what we read they do seem to tick a lot of boxes (but are also priced at a premium level). The addition of the built in power meter is great.

      Does your local store let you test them?

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
      • Thanks for the response.
        They do let me test them. Given your premium price comment, I assume you see better value than their Power Pro and Pro models?

        Reply
        • Hi again,

          Yes, effectively for a cheaper price you can get the Keiser M3i bike, which has all the benefits we mention in the article above (including measuring power/watts).

          Hope this helps!

          Kind Regards,
          Pierce

          Reply
  6. A couple of things:
    1 The heavier the fly wheel…the better!!! 40 pounds MINIMUM…..
    2 Replace the stupid slip in pedals with MTB clip ins and REALLY get a workout!! You will need to get some cycling shoes….but they are worth it!!!
    3 Belt vs. chain….I currently have a chain….and for the longest time….it would SLIP…..get a belt drive!!!
    4 A good spin bike with all the above can be bought…..NEW….for under $200.00….I’ve had my current one for over 10+ years….and I average over 150+ miles a week on it….my road bike has more miles per week…..but then again….my set up >$4000.00…….
    5 YES!!! Replace the seat/saddle!!!

    Reply
  7. Hello, I am looking at purchasing the Schwinn IC3 or the Sunny B 1805. Any thoughts on purchasing one of these or do you recommend another magnetic – belt bike? I am wanting to stay around 800 or lower. I might go a little higher but 1000 is definitely the top. Thanks

    Reply
    • Hi Rae,

      Thanks for the question, hopefully the following helps.

      We would go for the Sunny B1805 over the Schwinn IC3, due to the fact that the Schwinn does not have magnetic resistance (it does have a basic computer, while the B1805 does not, but you could always add a wahoo sensor to the B1805 and connect your mobile or iPad – the B1805 is in your price range).

      Having said all that about the Sunny B1805, if you like the Sunny bikes you might as well spend a another $100 and buy the Sunny B1709. The Sunny B1709 is belt driven and has magnetic resistance as well, it also has the flywheel in the rear (out of the sweat zone), has SPD pedals, and has a computer.

      Hope this helps, and do let us know if you have any follow up questions.

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
      • Thank you for your response. Upon further research I have stumbled upon the ASUNA Lancer and ASUNA 6100. I am unfamiliar with ASUNA which I think is still Sunny? What is the better quality between Sunny B1709 and ASUNA Lancer or ASUNA 6100? I can pay up to 1000 if I really need to . I am 5″2 with an inseam of 29 in but will be sharing the bike with my husband 6″0. The ASUNA 6100 is 899, ASUNA Lancer 888 and Sunny B1709 599. Thank you so much for your feedback.

        Reply
        • Hi Rae,

          Yes, the Asuna is just a range of bikes sold by Sunny Health and Fitness.

          The 3 models you are now talking about are the:
          – Sunny B1709 – has a very light flywheel at 7.36
          – Asuna 6100 – flywheel weight of 37lbs
          – Asuna 7130 (otherwise know as the Asuna Lancer) – flywheel weight of 33lbs

          The key difference between the Asuna models and the B1709 is the flywheel weight (and the B1709 is slightly cheaper).
          The lighter flywheel will create a different feel for the bike.
          https://groomandstyle.com/exercise-bike-flywheel-weight-light-vs-heavy/

          The key difference between the Asuna 6100 and Asuna 7130, is that the 6100 seems to be designed for a slightly smaller person, and it does have a computer which the 7130 does not.
          – Sunny B1709 – Inseam adjustment 28->39inches
          – Asuna 6100 – Inseam adjustment 28->42inches
          – Asuna 7130 (otherwise know as the Asuna Lancer) – Inseam adjustment 29->37inches

          Based on your comments so far…budget, size range etc, the Asuna 6100 might be a great fit for you and your husband.

          Kind Regards,
          Pierce

          Reply
        • Hi Leo,

          Thanks for touching base.

          We have tested the Sunny SF-B1805 and Sunny SF-B1001 models – the Sunny models offer a great balance of value and durability i.e. Sunny offer a great range of bikes.

          As for the B1709 vs the B1805, this really depends on budget and specific requirements etc. The key difference between the 2 is the flywheel positioning and weight i.e. the B1709 has the rear positioned flywheel with weight of 7.36lbs while the B1805 has the traditional forward positioned flywheel of weight 44lbs.

          Hope this helps.

          Kind Regards,
          Pierce

          Reply
  8. Hi there,
    Firstly great site and articles, really helpful advice. However, I’m after some more! I’ve been researching indoor bikes and have a budget of £500. I’m more of a runner so not in to cycling generally, but have recently been to some ‘spin’ classes where we used bodybike bikes and their app and training progs. I loved it, however they’re way over my budget. Basically, I wat a good quality bike that has magnetic resistance and I can link it to a training app so I can do programmes etc. The bodybike sessions used FTP and rpm as the key measures, not sure if there are other ways to measure your programme performance? I’m not overly bothered about whether the bike is a realistic cycling experience, I just want to use it to keep fit/get fitter. So in summary, magnetic resistance, good connectivity and/or programmes, max £500! Look forward to hearing from you, thanks, Paul

    Reply
    • Hey Paul,

      I had a quick look on Amazon in the UK, but am not really too familiar with most of the models available. This one (linked below) seems to have magnetic resistance and be belt driven, and is reasonably priced – it is most likely built in China, and not sure what the support is like, but chances are it would be alright for your needs -> particularly seeing you are not that concerned about the “feel” of the bike etc.
      Link to bike on Amazon -> https://geni.us/budget_magnet_belt

      I also had a look for second hand Keiser bikes, and there do seem to some available in the UK for under your budget.

      So in summary I think you could just buy the most “affordable” and “convenient” magnetic bike with cable drive train available to you.

      If you find some good options feel free to send them over and I can add my 2 cents worth.

      I think the key factor you will really want to think about is how you are going to link your new spin bike to your training app. There are 2 main training app options:
      – the easiest, where you use a peloton type workout app, where the instructors takes a spin class and talks about cadence/RPM and resistance (usually guestimated). For this you need a bike with a computer which supplies this information etc.
      – or participate in some group rides with apps like zwift etc. For this you need to send RPM and speed (to calculate a virtual power curve), or to be able to send power to the group ride app. This will typically require buying power pedals, or installing a wahoo cadence and speed sensor etc.

      We talk about this in detail in this post -> https://groomandstyle.com/peloton-spin-bike-alternatives/ (also read our answer to Sam below)

      The other option is if you have a road bike already you could just get a bike trainer which can transmit the power to the group ride app. A favourite option for
      triathletes etc… https://groomandstyle.com/best-bike-trainer-review-list/

      Let me know if you have any follow up questions.

      Cheers for now,
      Pierce

      Reply
  9. Hi,

    I was wondering what you thought of the Sunny B1709. It seems similar to the Keiser (7LB rear flywheel, magnetic resistance) but at a third of the price. Do you think they also use the higher speed?

    Thanks,

    John

    Reply
    • Hi John,

      Thanks for the question.

      We have not tried that Sunny model so can only make some general comments extrapolating from our knowledge of their brand and having testing some of their other models.

      The Sunny SF-B1709 looks like an extremely good option for those athletes looking for a magnetic resistance, belt driven bike with a good bunch of options (computer, SPD toe clips and cage) at a very reasonable price. Yes, for the bike to “work” at all (to simulate the feel of a road bike) the drive-train must be driving the flywheel at a higher speed to generate the required level of inertia – how this feels and performs relative to the Keiser we are not sure not having tested the bike.

      In terms of comparing the bikes, the key differentiator is going to be quality and branding – think along the lines of why would someone pay $10,000 or more for a luxury watch when you can buy a cheap digital watch for $5. The key indicators are that the Sunny bikes are manufactured in China and Sunny offer a 3 year warranty on the frame and 180 days on parts. The Keiser bikes are manufactured in the U.S.A and they offer a 10 year warranty on the frame and 3 years on parts.

      If you don’t need “the best” and are just after function then the Sunny SF-B1709 looks like an awesome choice. If you have cash to burn, want peace of mind in terms of build, full service support, and a bike that will last “a lifetime”, would be more motivated to ride on the Keiser, and like the kudos of having a premium product in your house then the Kesier might be the way to go.

      For those who want more information on the Sunny SF-B1709 you can find out more on Amazon via this link -> https://geni.us/sunnySFB1709

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
  10. Hello, so after reading through some of your reviews, I recently just purchased a body craft SPR, along with the computer for the bike. I also bought a wahoo cadence sensor. I want to try the fulgaz app on my Ipad. however when I pair my cadence sensor to the app, it tells me I need a power meter or speed. I am guessing that I should have bought the speed and cadence combo meter? Is that right? Will this fit somewhere close enough to the magnet on this bike? I guess I am struggling to get this set up. I need to have one sensor that will pair via bluetooth, but give me both speed and cadence is what I am thinking this means. Is this going to read resistance or speed? I know that this is what the call a Watt bike, but what options do I have to make this work? Can you help me get this set up? I really have appreciated your input and it lead me to the bodycraft bike, which I really like, however I am having a tough time getting the app working. Thanks so much and I will appreciate anything you can tell me.

    Reply
    • Hi Sam,

      Thanks for the question and sorry to hear about the difficulties you are having. Yes, it is unfortunate that the Bodycraft computer cannot transmit its information to a 3rd party device. I guess this is not a huge problem if you want to just particuate in an online spin class but is a big problem if you want to participate in a group ride with your spin bike.

      We have not tried the GulGaz app but based on the article below, yes you need to transmit power to the app – speed and cadence will not work i.e. FulGaz cannot calculate the virtual power based on speed and cadence, like other group ride apps.
      https://support.fulgaz.com/hc/en-us/articles/360004731531-Does-FulGaz-work-with-my-spin-bike-

      Are you willing to try with the Zwift app (or another type of app) that supports Virtual Power such as TrainerRoad, The Sufferfest, CycleOps Virtual Training,
      if so this should work by being able to approximate the power curve with the information they receive from the cadence/rpm and speed sensors (i.e. you would need to replace your cadence sensor for a “cadence and speed sensor”)? Please email Zwift first to confirm this will work.
      https://forums.zwift.com/t/spin-bike-without-ant-and-or-bluetooth/19545/6

      It is difficult to advise on exactly how to mount the speed sensor but I am sure there is a clever/creative way to do this. Are you confident enough to consider removing the cowling – not sure what that involves but it looks like there would be room there?
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1X8XVZG2ac0

      Please read the SPR Build Manual for more information.
      https://www.360fitnesssuperstore.com/pdf/fitness-equipment-manuals/BodyCraft/BodyCraft-SPR-IndoorCycle-Brochure.pdf

      Youtube also gives some ideas on how to mount the speed sensor on a spin bike by searching for the following keywords:
      setting up a speed sensor on spin bike
      setting up a spinning bike for zwift
      speed sensor on spin bike
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yUGaxeLILug
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F6Cv0bL3M98
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y1smOzT7srI
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xyUPrT5rvT8

      Otherwise, if mounting the speed sensor is too difficult, then you can consider buying some power meter pedals. If you do buy a power meter pedal/s then you will need to align the pedals with the shoes and cleats that you have. It seems that most power meters use the 3 hole cleat system, which is more of a “road bike” system. If you bought the optional clip in pedals with the Bodycraft bike then you most likely bought the “Dual sided, top quality SPD pedals”. One side with the toe cage, other with clip-in? SPD is short for Shimano Pedaling Dynamics and is a 2 hole system. Which means your SPD shoes most likely have 2 holes? So you might need to replace your shoes if you cannot find a power meter that has the 2 hole cleats?
      https://guides.wiggle.co.uk/cycling-pedals-and-cleats-buying-guide-0

      Some example power meter pedal are:
      Assioma UNO Side Pedal Based Power Meter -> https://geni.us/Assiomapowerpedal have “Look Keo” cleats. So which are a 3 hole system. (Note I think I read DUO
      model is best for use with zwift etc.)
      Garmin Vector 3S Pedal-Based Power Meter -> https://geni.us/garmin2spowerpedal also have “Look Keo” cleats.

      Hope this helps – good luck.

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
  11. Hey thanks for your article. I have been searching for a comparable spin bike like the ones in the spin classes I was taking. Smooth and comfortable ride. From your articles and the research I have done I see that belt driven is better than chain but I am still trying to decide which weight of fly wheel I should get. I noticed you had said a heavier wheel can cause knee problems and I don’t want that. What weight wheel would you suggest for a beginner?? I don’t want to spend over $800. Also there are many different spinning apps besides peloton like cylecast($9.99/month) and the one I am doing is called Les Mills (only $12/month with 30 days free) this particular app also have over 600+ different workout seems to be very good so far. Thanks

    Reply
    • Hi Holly,

      Thanks for the question and comment.

      Yes, we would always prefer a good quality belt designed bike over a chain driven bike where possible.

      In regard to the flywheel weights (I think you have read our article below on bike flywheel weight) the key point we were trying to get across is that a heavier flywheel is not necessarily better than a lighter flywheel – as a lot of people have assumed in the past.

      https://groomandstyle.com/exercise-bike-flywheel-weight-light-vs-heavy/

      The Keiser flywheel is lighter but has a beautifully designed poly v drive-train (can transmit very high loads over very small pulleys) – which means the lighter flywheel spins faster for every rotation of the wheel creating the required inertia to simulate the road bike feel.

      Most/all other bikes have gone for a heavier flywheel with a simpler designed drive train, which spin at lower speeds to create the required inertia.

      At the $800 price range I would suggest that flywheel weight (you are not going to find a light flywheel [8lbs] like the Keiser at this price range because the engineering required to stabilise the drive-train is too expensive for this price point) would be less of a factor than bike setup and cycling technique. The flywheel weight options might be 10lbs difference either way, and if you get a chance then do try the different bikes, but I doubt you will notice much difference.

      So take your time and focus on finding a bike that fits you best, set it up correctly, and spend a good amount of time focusing on your cycling/stroke technique and body position on the bike – these factors will serve you better over time.

      I hope this helps a little bit.

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
  12. I’m in the market for a home bike and looking for something that has a belt drive system with magnetic resistance but i am looking to spend under/around $500. I know it seems unrealistic at that price point but I came across the EFITMENT IC033 and wanted to know if you had any experience/opinions on this unit?
    Also, if a bike comes with an onboard display, which shows RPM’s, speed, etc.., would i still need the Wahoo sensor to join any “online” spin class?

    Reply
    • Hi Joe,

      Thanks for the question and bringing this bike brand to our attention.

      We have not tried the EFITMENT IC033 (or any of the EFITMENT bikes) but it certainly ticks a lot of boxes in terms of magnetic resistance (although a very simplified implementation and design of this feature), belt drive and monitor.

      For the price bracket, you are probably trading down on quality, durability, customer support, design etc. But if you do not want the bike to last forever then it certainly looks like an interesting alternative?

      For anyone else who is interested, you can read more about the bike on Amazon via this link > https://geni.us/efitment_bike

      You are also correct regarding using an online spin class i.e. if the bike has a configured display with RPM’s, speed, resistance (or some version of it) then you do not need to attach an addition sensor like the Wahoo.

      We talk about this in the article listed below.
      https://groomandstyle.com/peloton-spin-bike-alternatives/

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
  13. As someone looking to purchase a spin bike there are a lot of options out there. Initially, we were looking at a peloton but have decided that we can simply buy a more affordable bike to start and use their app. That said, there are two bikes near us from dealers that we’re interested in. 1) NXT black belt – couldn’t tell you anything about it except that it is used and they want $699, and 2) a NXT – also used, but $399. Would you feel confident enough purchasing one of these used? Anything I should look at prior to purchase? I appreciate your input.

    Reply
    • Hi Eric,

      Thanks for the question. The NXT black belt and NXT bikes are models manufactured by Madd Dogg Athletics – see our Number 4 write up. These are great quality bikes and as long as they have been looked after we would not have a problem buying a second hand or refurbished model (of course without seeing the bikes we cannot guarantee anything), and the prices you have mentioned sound very attractive. Maybe try and get some sort of free service or warranty as well?

      Neither bike has magnetic resistance (you would generally need to pay more for that) but the NXT Black Belt is belt driven and is the model we would recommend if you can afford it. The NXT is chain driven, and chain driven bikes are noisier and will require more servicing (which requires some skill) – and as this is a second-hand bike we would consider this a small risk.

      Hope this helped.

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
  14. Hi! I used to have the star trac spinning bike and for me was the perfect ride. Im looking to a comeback in Triathlon and for me indoor training is the most convenient choice. Im looking for a bike as good as my star trac or at least similar because I cannot find the same one, apparently they are discontinued. Which one do you recommend me?
    Thank you in advance!
    Carlos

    Reply
    • Hi Carlos,

      Thanks for getting in touch.

      The good news is that the Star Trac bikes are still available under the updated brand Spinner (previously Madd Dogg athletics and then Star Trac). Spinner has a wide range of high quality and durable bikes available (Lifestyle, Active, Performance and Commercial Series bikes) which you can read more about in our article above. We focused our review on the Spinner L7 Spin Lifestyle Series Indoor Cycling Bike, as it is a brilliant bike for the price and functionality.

      Let us know if you have any follow up questions.

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
  15. You have a great web site and expert information. I am an experienced road cyclist needing an indoor spin bike for winter. I have always used my road bike on a trainer. However, I have recently had shoulder surgery, with another to follow, so need a bike that will not be as aggressive in the cock pit as my own road bike. Which bike do you recommend to give me the most feel of being on the road? thanks

    Reply
    • Hey Gary,

      Sorry to hear about the shoulder issues – I personally know how annoying that can be.

      If you are happy to pay for a quality indoor spin bike (good news is they hold their value really well) then I would focus on the Keiser M3i or the Schwinn. They are both brilliant bikes, high quality etc. As we talk about in this article and the extended article linked below the key difference between the 2 bikes is the flywheel weight – as an experienced cyclist, you will find the Keiser light flywheel “easy” to get used to as you already have great cycling technique. The Schwinn will feel more like a typical spin bike (more aggressive pulling of the legs through the pedal stroke). If you have a chance to try both that would be ideal.

      https://groomandstyle.com/exercise-bike-flywheel-weight-light-vs-heavy/

      The other key difference is the handlebars – once again testing the bikes is the best option with your shoulder. But you can get a feel for the minimalist handlebars on the Keiser vs the Schwinn from the pics on this page.

      Hope this helps a bit.

      Cheers for now,
      Pierce

      Reply
  16. OK, I understand you recommend the Keiser M3i Plus. Is that the same as the Keiser M3iX? And do you recommend that over the M3i? Also, do you have a recommendation where is the best place to purchase this bike? Lastly, I would just hate to purchase this bike now only to find out that a better or updated option just about to be released in the Fall or at Christmas time. Do you have any knowledge of a reason why I should wait and purchase on Black Friday, or something like that?

    Thanks so much for all the work you have put in to help in making this decision.

    Reply
    • Hi Laurie,

      Thanks for the questions…hopefully, the following will help.

      The key difference between the Keiser M3i and the Keiser M3iX is that the M3iX comes with the X-bars. You can read more in our article above and watch the video for a detailed explanation. But in effect, the X-bars allow you to work out your upper body – they are pretty cool if your budget will extend that far and you want an all body work out.

      The core bike is unlikely to have any design/engineering changes between now and Black Friday/Christmas – although I will reach out to Keiser and confirm for you.

      As for the best place to buy the bike that really depends upon your location etc. The key options would be either direct from Keiser, through Amazon or a reseller. If you want more help with this please email me directly on [email protected] and we can provide some more help based on your location etc.

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
  17. Looking for a bike to be able to stand up and sprint, as well as use for rehab for my college athletes. Some will be 6’3″ and above. Will be housed in the fitness center, so others will use, as well. Any suggestions?

    Reply
    • Hey Jim,

      Thanks for your question. Effectively, any of the bikes we have mentioned on our page would meet your requirements i.e. they are designed to be used standing up and depending on your whether you like a heavy or light flywheel for rehab there are options as well (see our article below for more about that debate). You can also check out the height requirements for each bike in the blue box.

      http://groomandstyle.com/exercise-bike-flywheel-weight-light-vs-heavy/

      Did you have a budget in mind? How many bikes were you after?

      Personally, I would focus on Keiser or Schwinn bikes – brilliant bikes with great support and ideal for elite athletes.

      Let me know if you have any follow up questions.

      Cheers Pierce

      Reply
  18. Hello
    You do not talk about the 11.9 freemotion bike. I would like to know your opinion on this bike. A salesman tells me he’s better than the M3 keizer, what do you think? . I stay in an apartment, the bike should be noiseless, I like to ride a bike, I want to train every day and I need a console to make the interval. what bike did you recommend?

    Best Spin Bike Review – Top 8 Fittest List for Jul. 2018

    Reply
    • Hi again Marie,

      Please see our reply above and in addition:

      For a bike to be as quiet as possible it needs to be belt driven (not chain driven), magnetic resistance (not pad resistance) and built to very high specifications. The Keiser or Schwinn bikes would meet all these criteria. The 11.9 freemotion bike is also belt driven with magnetic resistance and seems to be built to a high standard, based on its long warranty.

      Good luck with the choice.

      Cheers again,
      Pierce

      Reply
  19. Hello
    You do not talk about the 11.9 freemotion bike, what do you think about this bike?
    A salesman pushes me to buy it and says it’s better than the Keizer M3. I would like to have your opinion and advise me on buying a spinning

    Reply
    • Hey Marie,

      Thanks for the question.

      We have not tried the freemotion range of bikes…but have answered a similar question from Jeff on the 13th of October 2017 (please check the question/answer above).

      In summary, we find it hard to believe that the freemotion is technically a better bike than the Keiser or Schwinn bikes. However, unless you were a really experienced cyclist you would probably not notice the differences, so if you are being offered a great price on the 11.9 freemotion bike then it might be a good option for you.

      Some points that you should note (in addition to the points we make in our answer to Jeff above):
      – the freemotion handlebars are even more simple than the Kesier handlebars
      – we have heard that the freemotion bikes are harder to maintain/setup
      – apparently, freemotion says they have a direct power measurement, but this is only on the left crank arm. Kesier and Schwinn use percieved wattage, which is typically enough for a “normal” user

      Hope this information helps a little bit.

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
  20. Hello. First off, thank you for your article. I’ve been searching for the best spin bike on a budget (not the most cheapest but not the most expensive either, somewhere in the middle! :)). Can you please tell me the difference/best option between the Sunny Sf-B901B, SF-B1423, and SF-B1002? I was seriously considering the Spinner S7 until I’ve read several comments and reviews that it’s not great for taller riders. If you have any other suggestions, I’m open. What are you thoughts on the Marcy Spin Bikes (XJ-3320 and JX-7038)?

    Reply
    • Hi Jackie,

      Thanks for the question. I think you are looking at the right bike brands, the key differences and specifications listed below (roughly in order of price at the time of writing, although prices can change all the time depending on sales etc, so its best to check prices for yourself).

      Sunny SF-B1001 (chain driven [noiser and more maintenance than belts], brilliant value no frills bike)
      chain driven, felt resistance, 30lbs flywheel, water bottle cage, fully adjustable (handlebars only vertical), seat 28-40inches, no monitor, 3 Year – Structural Frame, 90 day parts warranty
      Link to Product on Amazon -> http://geni.us/spinbikes5

      Sunny SF-B1423 (belt driven, brilliant value bike, limited height range, but monitor)
      Belt driven, felt resistance, 40lbs flywheel, water bottle cage, fully adjustable (handlebars only vertical), seat 27-36inches, monitor (time, speed, distance), 3 Year – Structural Frame, 90 day parts warranty
      Link to Product on Amazon -> http://geni.us/sunnysfb1423

      Marcy XJ-3320 (chain driven[ noiser and more maintenance than belts], good value and warranty)
      chain driven, felt resistance, 40lbs flywheel, water bottle cage, fully adjustable (handlebars only vertical), seat 36-41inches, no monitor, 2 year warranty
      Link to Product on Amazon -> http://geni.us/marcyxj3220

      Sunny SF-B901B (belt driven, wider height range available)
      Belt driven, felt resistance on sides, 40lbs flywheel, water bottle cage, fully adjustable (handlebars only vertical), seat 28.5-41inches, no monitor, 3 Year – Structural Frame, 90 day parts warranty
      Link to Product on Amazon -> http://geni.us/sunnysfb901b

      Sunny SF-B1002 (belt driven, heavier flywheel)
      Belt driven, felt resistance on top, 46lbs flywheel, water bottle cage, fully adjustable (handlebars only vertical), seat 29-40inches, no monitor, 3 Year – Structural Frame, 90 day parts warranty
      Link to Product on Amazon -> http://geni.us/sunnysfb1002

      Marcy JX-7038 (belt driven, fully adjustable seat and handlebars)
      Belt driven, felt resistance, 40lbs flywheel, water bottle cage, fully adjustable (handlebars only vertical and horizontal), seat 35-44 inches, no monitor, 2 year warranty
      Link to Product on Amazon -> http://geni.us/marcyjx7038

      Hope this helps.

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
  21. I was curious if you knew the difference between the spinner s7 and the l7.the s7 is sold at Costco for $500, which seems like a good price, but is it an inferior bike? On spinner website it is more expensive than the l7 but they don’t list any specs. I can’t find a store to try out any of these bikes and have really short legs so I need a good return policy. Also, I’m new to cycling so wanting to not spend too much. Thanks!

    Reply
    • Hi Cosette,

      Thanks for the great question.

      The L7 bike is part of the upgraded Lifestyle Series of bikes. The key difference between the L7 and the S7 (other than the paint job) is the ability to move the handlebars fore and aft (forward and back).

      Link to the L7 bike on Amazon -> http://geni.us/spinnerl7
      Link to the S7 bike on Amazon -> http://geni.us/spinners7

      Hope this helps, and good luck with the choice.

      Kind Regards,
      Lisa

      Reply
  22. Can you tell me your thoughts on the Proform studio bike. I like that it has negative and positive inclines; however, how is the Quality?

    Reply
    • Hi Jeffrey,

      Yes, we have gotten quite a few questions about the ProForm Studio bike (see answers to Janae on 31st Dec 2017 and Barry on 21st of Feb 2018)…probably because this bike should be great due to the functionality offered and the price range. Maybe, however, due to these factors, something has to “slip” and it appears in this case that might be quality and customer service – up to this point these factors have put us off testing the bike and recommending it.

      Only you can answer whether you are willing to risk a slightly lower quality bike for some potentially great functionality – maybe the worst that can happen is that you have to return the bike? As we mentioned to Janae, test out the customer service yourself by ringing the company to get a feel for the service, warranty and support offered.

      If you do decide to purchase the bike please get in touch as we would love to hear about your experience.

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
  23. Hi
    I’ve been struggling to make a decision on a spin type bike for my daughter. I have spent months researching and have narrowed it down to the Sole SB900 or the Bodycraft SPT mag. I came very close to ordering the Sole but was concerned with the Q factor of 8 inches since my daughter in 5’4” and only weighs 110. The Q factor is 6.8 on the Bodycraft. She has long arms and legs and is very slim/narrow in the hips. I’m also concerned with the reviews regarding the resistance on the Sole. Am I worrying to much about the Q factor? Can you make a recommendation? She’s been riding a Stages at a boutique spin club. Thank you in advance for your help.

    Reply
    • Hi Shelley,

      Thanks for the question.

      If you are not in a position where your daughter can try out the Sole SB900 or Bodycraft SPT, and as you like both of those bikes, and with your daughter’s narrow hips, it does make sense to consider the Q factor difference between these 2 bikes. If I am not mistaken the Stages bike has a Q factor of about 6 inches (like the Bodycraft), and if she is comfortable on that bike, then it probably also suggests that the Bodycraft might be a better choice?

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
    • Hi Kathy,

      Yes, the Sunny Health & Fitness model SF-B1002 is a belt driven option which is probably twice the price of the Sunny SF-B1001.

      Sunny Health & Fitness model SF-B1002 link to Amazon -> http://geni.us/sunnyspinsfb1002

      There are distinct differences between choosing a belt driven exercise bike to a chain driven bike. A belt driven bike is generally quieter (good if you want to watch TV etc), smoother feel and requires less maintenance overall. Maintenance-wise you will need to lubricate (and tighten/adjust) a chain-driven bike more often than with a belt bike – but after a few years (depending on the quality of the belt) you will need to replace the belt i.e. there is not maintenance option for the belt but to replace it. Chain driven bikes are also generally cheaper, relative to the quality of the bike.

      Bringing this discussion back to the Sunny Health range of bikes, you have the option of buying the slightly cheaper chain drive SF-B1001 model (which will require a bit more maintenance and will be a bit noisier) or paying a bit more for the quieter and smoother SF-B1002 belt driven bike with less maintenance required overall.

      Hope this helps.

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
  24. I just want to say THANK YOU for all of the above! You have helped me get the information I need to buy something other than the Peloton, while still being able to get the experience. Greatly appreciated

    Reply
  25. Thanks for compiling all this helpful information. I suggest you look at the “Q factor” as an important variable (this is the distance/width between pedals). I was set to purchase a Sole SB900 but in trying it out today, I noticed how far apart the pedals are from each. I believe it’s Q-factor is over 200 mm. The Q factor is often not listed in the ads so you have to dig a bit. It can make a difference to comfort and even risk of injury.
    Best,
    Maureen

    Reply
    • Hey Maureen,

      Thanks for the comment – we have updated the information for the models where we could find it, and contacted the manufacturer to see if they can provide the required information where it is unavailable.

      For those who are interested, the Q factor is the horizontal distance between the beginning of the pedals – or the horizontal distance between the cranks at the point where the pedals would attach to the cranks. Generally, the required distance comes down to personal preference, but it should not be too wide otherwise you can generate strain on your hips and knees – within reason narrower is better. However, typically, the Q factor on indoor bikes is wider than that for outdoor bikes to accommodate the frame and drivetrain.

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
  26. Hi Pierce,

    Thank you for your quick response. A couple of follow-ups
    1) thanks – I believe this answers sufficiently. Ultimately, it is about feel but sounds like those bikes are on par with Peloton quality with cheaper price tag
    2) Sounds like you believe these bikes are better than Peloton quality overall, but again, all good bikes, mostly about feel 3) My question here was really about the difference between an SB900 or similar and a Keiser or similar. If they both have long warranties, good stability, belt driven and magnetic resistance – then what is causing such a huge price disparity?
    4) I have read this article a few times – still confused. I understand if I use a bike like “Sunny”, I will need to buy a sensor…however, what about the above bikes. Don’t they already have cadence and resistance on their computer interface? If so, I would imagine there is virtually zero set up to get the Peloton experience, merely buy the app and place it in front of you? Am I missing something?
    5) Thanks for the idea
    Again, really appreciate the feedback.
    Thanks,
    Dana

    Reply
    • Hey Dana,

      No probs, more than happy to help were we can.

      Merging the answers for 1-3…hopefully, I do not confuse you even more… 🙂

      So, the Peloton, Keiser, Schwinn bikes are better bikes than the lower priced SB900 and Diamondback etc. At the end of the day, you do get what you pay for. The key point I was trying to make, if you are price sensitive, is that you do not necessarily need a Premium exercise bike to achieve your fitness goals.

      To use the analogy of a road bike, if you just want to get fit, you do not need the latest carbon fiber $7000 road bike with top of the range components, you can buy a $200 steel framed bike and, as long as you actually use it, still get fit. As with any premium product, it is those incremental improvements in design, with bikes such as the Peloton, Keiser and Schwinn bikes that will cost you more. You will pay more for the improved design features (such as the Keiser rear flywheel design, and the Schwinn ErgoLoop handlebars, and the Peloton infrastructure) and a “better” build which is reflected in the longer warranties (10 years on the frame etc with the Keiser and Schwinn vs 5 years with the Diamondback etc.).

      Most people will not notice or need most of these features – but for a good exercise bike experience you will notice things such as the drive chain and resistance type – which is why we try and steer people towards belt driven (lower maintenance and noise) and magnetic resistance bikes (more accurate control and less maintenance). Which is what you get for a reasonable price with the SB900 and Diamondback bikes.

      If you add a premium bike (Peloton, Keiser and Schwinn) to your shortlist and a mid-range bike (SB900 or Diamondback bikes) and try both you will probably notice that the Premium bike is slightly quieter, smoother, more robust, with nicer finishing’s – but once again a mid-range bike, if used, will get you just as fit!

      You are absolutely right about the Exercise Bike Setup for the Peloton App – if the bike you buy comes standard with a basic computer that shows Cadence/RPM, Power and resistance then there is no setup required (I will update our article to make this clearer).

      Hopefully, this clears things up a bit – good luck with your choice and let us know what you decide on.

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
  27. Hi, I’ve read several reviews and am unsure of one item which interests me on a bike. I am looking for a bike that not only will provide heart rate, rpm, time, distance etc., but also has automated workout selections (speed, road, terrain, timed workouts). The bike I end up with will be one of the higher end models, magnetic with complete handle bar adjustments, pedal switch outs and a comfortable seat. Which bike will offer me the technology i’ve mentioned? If none, is there an app that can be bought to use/install on any bike? Thank you. Barry.

    Reply
    • Hi Barry,

      Thanks for your question on G+S.

      There are 2 main schools of thought on this question… Firstly, buy the best “pure” spin bike you can afford with a quality monitor to measure power, cadence, etc. (one without built-in workouts) and then set yourself up with the Peloton app (for group spin classes). Alternatively, you will want to find a bike that you can set up to transmit watts via ANT+ and then connect to the ZWIFT app, so you can go on group rides “outside” etc. (but ZWIFT won’t be able to control your bike like it can with something like the Wahoo Bike Trainer).

      Check out our article linked below for some options.
      http://groomandstyle.com/peloton-spin-bike-alternatives/

      The other alternative is to go for a bike like the Spinner eSpin; or NordicTrack GrandTour Pro and ProForm TDF (Tour De France) bikes which use the iFIT functionality.

      Spinner eSpin bike Link to Amazon -> http://geni.us/spinnerespin

      ProForm TDF bike Link to Amazon -> http://geni.us/ProformTDF

      NordicTrack Link
      https://www.nordictrack.co.uk/exercise-bikes/nordictrack-grand-tour-exercise-bike.html

      Another new player in the market is the Watt Bike – haven’t spent much time researching them, but they look very interesting.
      https://wattbike.com/gb/product/atom

      Hope this helps a bit and good luck with the research.

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
  28. Hi – great article and responses. I am looking to make my first indoor bike purchase. I have tried the Peloton in studio and enjoyed it, but am disappointed with the $40 per month subscription price – would prefer to just use the app for $12 per month. In that case – I am trying to decide which bike to purchase with the following questions
    1) What bikes are similar to Peloton but at a lower price (for example, how does an SB900 or Diamondback, at half the price, stack up to the Peloton bike)
    2) What bikes cost the same but are better quality (for example, how does the Keiser, Schwinn or BodyCraft stack up vs Peloton)
    3) How should I think about the difference between 1 and 2, i.e. what am I getting for $1,000
    4) When setting up the bike for Peloton app – (in the above bikes – do you need a Wahoo cadence sensor or something similar if they already have a computer that gives you cadence or resistance)
    5) In choosing a final bike – do you know where these can be ridden / tested prior to purchase?

    Really appreciate the help – ultimately I feel there is a premium for the “Peloton” brand, and would like to get better value, especially on the monthly subscription going forward. Thanks,

    Reply
    • Hey Dana,

      Thanks for your questions. Going through your questions one by one…

      1) What bikes are similar to Peloton but at a lower price (for example, how does an SB900 or Diamondback, at half the price, stack up to the Peloton bike)?

      G+S think that the SB900 and Diamondback are great quality bikes for the price, they just don’t have the “complete” infrastructure and premium price of the Peloton. For example, you can buy any magnetic resistance, belt driven bike and setup it up to use the Peloton app, and have a very similar experience to that of using the Peloton bike.

      2) What bikes cost the same but are better quality (for example, how does the Keiser, Schwinn or BodyCraft stack up vs Peloton).

      Once again the Keiser and Schwinn are our favorite pure exercise bikes, for quality and on “road feel”. There is a large range of bikes which we have on the list to test this year such as the Life Fitness range of bikes, Watt bikes, and Fly Anywhere bike…just to confuse you some more.

      3) How should I think about the difference between 1 and 2, i.e. what am I getting for $1,000

      You are paying a premium for the complete hassle free setup when buying the Peloton bike, and enclosed exercise “environment” (think of the Apple iPhone, iPad infrastructure).

      4) When setting up the bike for Peloton app – (in the above bikes – do you need a Wahoo cadence sensor or something similar if they already have a computer that gives you cadence or resistance)

      As long as you buy a bike with a power meter and cadenace/RPM you do not need to do anything else to use the Peloton app. You can read more in our article below.

      http://groomandstyle.com/peloton-spin-bike-alternatives/

      5) In choosing a final bike – do you know where these can be ridden / tested prior to purchase?

      We would choose a short list of bike and then contact the manufacturers to see if they can suggest any gyms or studios which have the bike’s setup. This really depends on which city you live in etc.

      In summary, as you suggested, the range of options can be overwhelming…but please remember that any of these bikes, if used consistently will get you fit and healthy (and helps you achieve your goals) and will last a long time. The medium range bikes upwards are typically of exceptional quality, with extensive warranties. I would start by listing your top 3 buying criteria and then an upper budget, create a short list and then find a studio to test the bikes. Then purchase the bike that gets you most excited.

      Hope this helps a little bit.

      Cheers for now,
      Pierce

      Reply
  29. The Spinner NXT bike and other Spinner bikes mentioned here are no longer being manufactured, so this list is out of date. Madd Dogg Athletics (Spinning empire) has revamped their lineup since last year.

    Reply
  30. Hello,
    Do you have any insight into the BKOOL bike that is “coming soon”? Wondering if it would be worth waiting for?
    Kindly,
    Amy

    Reply
  31. Hi Chris,

    Have you guys looked at the new Fly Anywhere bike. I went and tried it at the local fly studio and it seems like a great bike but it’s hard to tell when you use it for a few minutes.

    Thanks,

    Mark

    Reply
    • Hey Mark,

      We haven’t, but thanks for the suggestion – we will add it to the list of bikes we want to test for 2018…

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
  32. Pierce,

    Ordered my SB900 on December 15th hoping to have it by Christmas vacation. No such luck, as it has been stuck in Carlisle, PA forever and is showing no signs of arriving at my doorstep any time soon. I am still happy with my choice, but a little frustrated with the “free” delivery. Thought your readers might like to know.

    Thanks and Happy New Year.

    Chris

    Reply
  33. Your article has been very helpful in shopping dor a bike ! I originally absolutely wanted the peloton and that has slowly faded . I love the idea of streaming spin classes at home as I am a full time working mom and getting to the gym is near impossible with my hours . With that said I’ve looked at some options with a smaller than peloton price tag such as the NordicTrack grand tour pro or the ProForm studio bike pro … similar tech to peloton … but are they good intermediate spin bikes ??? Or should I go with the sole SB900 and use my iPad ? I’m so torn , there are so many choices! Thanks in advance for your help !

    Reply
    • Hi Janae,

      Unfortunately, none of our team has tested the NordicTrack or ProForm Sutdio Bikes. From what we can tell, they are very reasonable bikes for the price point (they are chain driven, magnetic resistance bikes with what seems like reasonable warranties) considering the iFit functionality that is included; but they will obviously not have the same high quality of a commercial grade spin bike like the Keiser or Schwinn.

      Nordictrack and ProFrom Sutdio Pro (which are owned by the same company), from what we have heard, fall slightly short in the customer service department. I would suggest that you test this out yourself by ringing their help line and speaking to a representative – to get a feel for their support and how helpful they would be if you ever had an issue with the bike.

      In terms of whether you should go for a bike like the sole SB900 (or a very similar bike like the Diamondback 910ic) I would say this depends on 2 key points. Firstly, whether you have the patience and ability to learn how to setup your new exercise bike to utlise the Peloton ap etc. You can read our article below which will give you some ideas of what is involved. http://groomandstyle.com/peloton-spin-bike-alternatives/

      The second factor is to work out which bike excites you the most – because that the bike that you will get you on it when you have to decide whether to have a work out for a glass of wine. You can have the most speced out bike, but if you don’t want to jump on it, then it is nothing more than an expensive clothes horse.

      At the end of the day, any of these bikes you are considering will get your fit and in shape, and will last for a long time, as long as you use it…

      Hopefully, these ideas help you a little bit – do let us know if you have any follow up questions.

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
  34. I am 6’3 which is on the upper end of the sole, do you think this will work for me or would the diamondback be a better choice? I think I like the sole better but the height makes Me Nervous

    Reply
    • Hi Ryan,

      Happy holidays. Groom+Style contacted Sole on your behalf, and they said “Thank you for your interest in Sole. Yes, the Sole SB900 and SB700 are adjustable enough for your height at 6 foot 3 inches – the rule of thumb is 5′ minimum, and 6’8″ max…”

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
  35. Pierce,

    Thanks for the good advice. I just ordered the Sole SB900 on sale for $900, which is less than the Diamondback. Looking forward to getting back into shape.

    Chris

    Reply
  36. Trying to decide on a gift for my wife. She uses the Peloton app riding our older style cheap exercise bike and want to get her a more robust spin bike. I see you recommend the Sole SB900 and the Diamondback 510IC fairly consistently, as do many other sites. My main question, considering they both can be bought now during the holiday sales for $700-$1000, price aside, which would you recommend of the two. I’m leaning toward the SB900, if for no other reason than the warranty.

    Your article has been very helpful, thank you!

    Eric

    Reply
    • Hi Eric,

      What a great gift idea – I might need to up my game when choosing a gift for my wife.

      Yes, we would lean towards the Sole SB900 in the scenario where the price is comparative to the Diamondback 910ic/510ic…for the peace of mind provided by the lengthier warranty. Enjoy…

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
  37. Hi Pierce,
    Any thoughts on SPIRIT FITNESS CIC800 COMMERCIAL INDOOR BIKE? From what I’ve read it also has a magnetic resistance and poly-v belt drive. I too am hoping for a good alternative to the peloton bike given the price tag plus the yearly subscription rates. I am just planning to use the app and stream it to my tv using an appletv

    Thanks,
    Lucy

    Reply
    • Hi Lucy,

      None of the team has tried the Spirit Fitness CIC 800, but from a specification point of view, it does look pretty compelling (magnetic resistance, poly-v belt etc as you mentioned). I would stack it up against something like the Sole SB900, with the Sole maybe having a few advantages such as a basic computer (RPM, time, distance, speed etc) and a lifetime parts and frame warranty…just another alternative for you to consider at the same price point.

      Read more by following this link -> http://geni.us/solesb900

      Happy shopping!

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
  38. Great article! After finally rejecting the Peloton as too expensive, I’ve narrowed my choices down to the Sole SB900 or the Diamondback 910ic. We might run the Peloton app on an iPad in the future, but for now we’re going to rely on simpler and less expensive technology. If you had to choose between the Diamondback and the Sole, which would you pick?

    Thanks!

    Chris

    Reply
    • Hi Chris,

      Great idea, the Peloton bike and “environment” is great, but on the expensive side. And, as you pointed out there is nothing stopping you from setting up an exercise bike to use their training app etc. We talk about this in the article linked below.
      http://groomandstyle.com/peloton-spin-bike-alternatives/

      In terms of a Sole SB900 vs the Diamondback 910ic comparison…usually, the Sole SB900 is priced significantly higher than the Diamondback 910ic, but we have noticed that over this holiday period this might not be the case. So if you can buy the Sole SB900 at a discounted price close to or near the 910ic we would suggest you go for that.

      In terms of bike design, the Sole SB900 and Diamondback 910ic/510ic are quite similar, they are both belt driven, magnetic resistance, fully adjustable bikes with heavy flywheels (40+ lbs). The Diamondback has the more advanced integrated console/workout feature, but if you are going to use the Peloton app in the future, both the Sole SB900 and Diamondback report RPMs/cadence which should be enough.

      One of the key benefits of the Sole SB900 (which is why it is usually priced at a premium to the Diamondback) is that it comes with a superior warranty… Sole Fitness (New & Boxed models) 3 years labour, lifetime parts.

      Good luck with the choice, hope this information helps a bit.

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
  39. Hi, there. Glad I found this article – very helpful. We are looking to add two bikes to our home gym – I don’t need anything “specific” as it seems they would all accommodate my 5’3″ frame. My husband, however, is 6’5″ – 220 lbs. and I am looking for recommendations for a comfortable bike for him. I would like to be under $700 tops.

    Reply
    • Hi Karen,

      There are 2 great options we can think of…

      Depending on what sales are available the Spinner Sprint or NXT bikes might fit your budget.
      Spinner Sprint (riders up to 6″8′) -> link to bike on Amazon http://geni.us/spinbikes8
      Spinner Star Track NXT (riders up to 6″10′) -> link to bike on Amazon http://geni.us/spinbikes3

      Or at a price comfortably under your budget, you might want to consider
      Sunny Health & Fitness SF-B1516 (riders up to 7″1′) -> link to bike on Amazon http://geni.us/sunnyhealthSFB1516

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
  40. Hi Pierce,
    Bottom line is the Schwinn is far superior to any of the bikes you reviewed. Ergonomics, handlebars, perimeter weighted flywheel are all critically important and are far superior to the Keiser. To add, I have ridden all of your recommended bikes from your article and the Schwinn and can say, without qualification, that the Schwinn is the Rolls Royce of spin bikes and its price point is much in keeping with Keiser’s. Again, your article does give mention to the Schwinn but it does so as an afterthought and a bike that is not to be taken seriously, otherwise, it would be listed and the only thing that you can say is that it is more expensive which I would argue. In fact, my Schwinn AC Performance Plus was the same price as the Keiser. Enough said. Schwinn AC Performance Plus bikes rule the day when it comes to spin bikes. End of story.
    Cheers,
    Bryan

    Reply
    • Thanks Bryan,

      Appreciate the comment and keeping us on our toes – you are right the Schwinn was not getting the acknowledgement in the article that it deserved. We have updated the list with option 1a, for those riders who prefer an Exercise Bike with a heavier flywheel.

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
  41. Hi,
    Please comment on the new ASUNA bikes, esp. the Minotaur. The SPT-Mag has a very small footprint; how might this affect comfort, etc. Yes, seat and bars are adjustable, but the cockpit looks compressed. Also, the Keiser handlebars seem to offer fewer positions than comparable bikes. Any comments?
    Thanks-you guys are doing a great service for consumers.

    Reply
    • Hi Steve,

      Hope you are well, thanks for your question on Groom+Style.

      It looks like you are doing some great research, has that extended to trying any of these exercise bikes? What is your ideal price point – from the bikes you are looking at I would guess under $1500?

      Here are my initial thoughts:

      Overall we like the Sunny Health & Fitness bikes, they are generally well-made bikes with strong customer support. So the Asuna 6100 has a 37lb flywheel, is placed under the rider, but the moving wheels are placed under the handlebars. This design will make it “hard” to move the bike. Not a deal breaker but something to consider if you want to be able to move your bike a lot. The Keiser is designed with a very light flywheel so it is easy to move even with the flywheel under the seat.

      The Asuna 7150 does not have this issue as the flywheel is placed under the handlebars. The bike looks very solid, good adjustability, great warranty, is belt drive and has magnetic resistance. Overall looks like a good buy. For the price, it might be nice to get a computer?

      The Bodycraft SPT-Mag…Yes, this is the type of bike you probably would like to trial before buying. If you were 6foot plus the inward sloping handlebar stem might make you feel a bit cramped. Would be good to trial both sitting down and out of the saddle.

      Regarding the Keiser handlebars. Indoor exercise bike handlebars fall into two main types:
      – Those for people who want indoor cycle training…these will have the drop bars you see on outdoor racing bikes.
      – Spinning training bikes…with bullhorn handlebars for standing up and training.
      Some bikes have both types of handles built in. Keiser is designed for spinning training and therefore has not added drop bars. Having said that their handlebars are still quite minimalist compared to a bike like the Schwinn Ac Performance Plus. I have never found the minimalist handlebar design on the Keiser to be a problem (there are enough positions sitting down and out of the saddle), but for some riders, this is a deal breaker (if you fit into this category then the Schwinn Ac Performance Plus is a great option).

      Have you considered the Sole Fitness SB900? This is a great, belt drive, magnetic resistance bike with a basic computer for under $1500 – might be worth a look?

      Anyway, hope this helps for now, please let me know if you have any other questions.

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
  42. Hello. Thank you for all the information, it has been helpful. Would you give me your opinion on the Lemond Rev Master Pro and the two Body Solid bikes below? Do any of these 3 use the magnetic breaking (I can’t confirm either way, so I am thinking Not)?
    I”m okay with the pricing on the Keiser so I’m really just trying to figure out which will be the best bike for my wife and I to use at home.

    http://www.lemondfitness.com/product_detail/3/revmaster-pro
    https://www.bodysolid.com/home/esb250/endurance_exercise_bike
    https://www.bodysolid.com/home/esb150/endurance_indoor_exercise_bike

    BTW after reading reviews on the Peloton bike– the fact that you can’t use the built in monitor for anything except Peleton’s proprietary classes was enough for me to just say “no” to that bike. Yes that means you can’t surf the web etc.

    Thanks so much
    Matt

    Reply
    • Hi Matt,

      Glad you are finding the information on our site helpful.

      The 3 bikes you have mentioned (Lemond Revmaster Pro, Body Solid ESB250 and ESB 150) all use resistance pads, as opposed to magnetic resistance. For more precise resistance control, durability etc. magnetic resistance is preferred, but it will obviously cost more.

      Yes, the Peloton bike seems to divide people quite decisively i.e. you either like it or hate it. No doubt it is a high-quality product/solution that will keep you motivated to train, but you will pay a premium and you are locked into their environment. It is a bit like the Apple (Peloton, closed “environment”) vs Android (more open system).

      Good luck with your choice, do let us know if you have any other questions.

      Kind Regards,
      Lisa

      Reply
  43. Amazing article- even better responses to all the questions!
    I have been riding outside for about 20 years. I would suppliment my outdoor riding with spin classes. I have used all manner of spin bikes, but the last 2 years I have been using the free motion 11.9. I really seemed to like them. Good feel and I enjoyed their monitor. Although they seemed a bit off on calibration from bike to bike. I guess it wouldn’t matter for home use as you could adjust. I also just rode the Kaiser M3. It did feel a little off with the lower gears but seemed to be really well tuned to tougher gears. I just recently moved from Northern California to Lacey Washington. Needless to say I’m going to be riding indoors a lot more often. I have been looking at bikes for a personal indoor gym. I seem to be drawn to the idea of belt drive due to less maintance. I didn’t see any reviews or input you had on the freemotion or how you would compare the two? I am trying to find a used one and would appreciate any help you could offer. Thanks again.
    Jeff

    Reply
    • Hey Jeff,

      As you have personally tried both bikes, my gut feel would be that you should focus on whichever bike you feel most comfortable on (fit and feel) -> because that is the bike you will be most drawn to jumping on again and again.

      In terms of the most important features they are probably quite similar; quality of build (and therefore long warranty periods), carbon drive belts, eddy current magnetic system etc.

      One of the key design difference is the flywheel weight and position. We talk in our article about how we like the feel of the lighter flywheel (link below if you missed it) on the Keiser and the fact that it is positioned under the rider (away from the sweat zone, which can reduce potential wear from sweat etc.). But someone people do still like the idea of a heavier flywheel (about 32 pounds on the free motion bike I think vs the 8lbs on the Keiser).

      One other factor you might want to consider is that the Keiser bikes are much easier to maintain and have a better designed more reliable Poly-V belt drive train (same design as used in cars) vs. the Carbon Drive™ technology used in the freemotion bike.

      The other quick observation is that the handlebars on the freemotion do not give many options for hand position – not sure if you felt this was an issue when you were riding.

      http://groomandstyle.com/exercise-bike-flywheel-weight-light-vs-heavy/

      Cheers for now,
      Pierce

      Reply
  44. i bought Sunny bike for knee rehab after surgery. With the low cost I figured if I hated indoor cycling I wasn’t out much. Turns out I love it as I modified it to be like a Peloton bike and use the app. Now I am looking for something a little more advanced. My main desire, other than comfort, is to be able to “see” a resistance number instead of a knob I randomly adjust to what feels like the right resistance. I realize I won’t be able to match resistance recommendations exactly from the app, but I would like to have a point I know to start from and work my way up or at least know where my starting point is each ride. I really like the looks and description of the Keiser. Is that what you would recommend in a situation like this? As for the resistance adjustments, are the increments about the same without major jumps from low to high? Just wondering how the range works.

    Thanks so much! Your article (and that on the flywheel) have given me a lot of information!

    Carol

    Reply
    • Hi Carol,

      Thanks for your comment.

      Yes, I think the Keiser would be a great choice (or any belt driven bike with magnetic
      resistance and a decent computer – see additional bike options just below). The gears on the Keiser are from marked from 1-24 and
      they are consistent/linear increments. You might find the Keiser manual (linked
      below) a useful read.
      http://manuals.keiser.com/downloads/exercise_bikes/M3-M3+-User-Manual.pdf

      Another article that you might find interesting
      http://groomandstyle.com/peloton-spin-bike-alternatives/

      Alternatives to the Keiser
      There are a few belt driven, magnetic resistance indoor bikes available at a range
      of prices. We actually discussed the most viable options in the comment section above,
      in:
      – our reply to Susan on the JULY 13, 2017
      – and our reply to Nancy on the AUGUST 1, 2017.
      In summary the bikes you might want to consider, in order of price are (the Keiser
      bikes would of course be at the top of the list):
      1) Schwinn ac performance plus with carbon blue belt drive
      2) Bodycraft SPR Indoor Group Cycle
      3) Sole SB900

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
  45. Thank you for your continued help! I am starting to further narrow down the choices. I have included the diamondback into the selection process. Do you have any thoughts on the 910ic over the 510ic? All the awards seem to go to the 510. It’s a huge price jump to the Keisers and Schwinn so wanted to really consider the Diamondbacks before taking the plunge with the Keiser or BodyCraft that seems to be calling my name. I wish the Sole had a computer because I love that price point.

    Reply
    • Hi Carina,

      With the Diamondback Fitness bikes, for about $200 more you get the 910ic (pasted from the article above) with:
      -32 levels of resistance, as opposed to 16 on the 510Ic
      -Bike generates its own power, as opposed to the 510Ic which is AC powered
      -An integrated heart rate receiver i.e. you need to purchase a heart rate monitor like the Polar Heart monitor, which the 910Ic will display

      Also, the Sole SB900, does come with a basic integrated console/computer with RPM, time, KCal, distance/speed, and a heart rate monitor with chest strap that can be purchased separately.

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
  46. I’m looking to buy my first indoor bike. A spin class at a gym doesn’t work for me. Understanding that there are a wide variety of bikes, I do not want to make an investment in a mid-range bike that I will come to regret. Knowing that a belt drive and magnetic resistance will give me a superior bike, is there a close second that unless I were extremely experienced I wouldn’t recognize? Basically a fantastic mid-range vs a superior highend bike. Asking for too much? I will spend the money if needed to have a ride that is smart with its use of resistance gears and console, comfortable and reliable.

    Reply
    • Hi Carina,

      Thanks for the question. There are a few belt driven, magnetic resistance indoor bikes available at a range of prices. We actually discussed the most viable options in the comment section above, in:
      – our reply to Susan on the JULY 13, 2017
      – and our reply to Nancy on the AUGUST 1, 2017.

      In summary the bikes you might want to consider, in order of price are (the Keiser bikes would of course be at the top of the list):
      1) Schwinn ac performance plus with carbon blue belt drive
      Read more on Amazon by following this link -> http://geni.us/schwinnacperformplus
      2) Bodycraft SPR Indoor Group Cycle
      Read more on Amazon by following this link -> http://geni.us/bodycraftspr
      3) Sole SB900
      Read more on Amazon by following this link -> http://geni.us/solesb900

      Hope this helps.

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
    • Hi Janet,

      The Fitness Reality X-Class 710 Indoor cycle actually looks like a very high quality indoor cycling bike for the price. One of the first things that stands out is the amazing warranty that is offered – lifetime warranty on the frame, 5 years on the parts, 2 years on the electronics and 2 years for wear and tear. Fitness Reality obviously have confidence in their product which is great!

      Based on our experience we would suggest that the bike is fairly priced for what is offered – a fully adjustable, pad resistance, hybrid pedal, belt driven (arguably lower maintenance that a chain driven bike) bike with a reasonable computer.

      Please follow this link to Amazon to check the current price and read more about the bike.
      http://geni.us/fitnessreality710

      The question you might want to ask yourself is would you be better of spending another $100 to buy a bike like the Diamondback Fitness 510Ic Indoor Cycle? The 510Ic offers magnetic resistance (needs to be plugged into a power source) which is a major advantage over the less reliable and quicker wearing pad systems, comes with 16 levels of computer-controlled resistance, console with heart rate monitor, and another confidence inspiring warranty (lifetime warranty on the frame and brake system 3 years on the parts, 3 years on the electronics and 90 days on wear and tear). You can read more in the article above.

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
  47. Hi,
    I am looking for a indoor spin bike that requires low maintenance and rides smoothly. I had Peleton in mind but I don’t like the one year subscription. I am now looking into the Spinner Rally or the Spinner Ride. Could you please help me choose a spin bike?
    Thank you!

    Reply
    • Hi Nancy,

      Thanks for the question. If you are after a top of the range exercise bike that will virtually never need maintenance, then you will need to focus on bikes that have 2 key features:
      – belt drive (rather than chain driven bikes)
      – bikes with magnetic resistance (rather than pad resistance)

      In terms of the best bikes with these features you have the Keiser range of bikes (our preferred choice which is no 1 on our list above), and if you read our reply to Susan on July the 13th 2017 you will find out about 3 other options:
      1) Bodycraft SPR Indoor Group Cycle
      Read more by following this link -> http://geni.us/bodycraftspr
      2) Schwinn ac performance plus with carbon blue belt drive
      Read more by following this link -> http://geni.us/schwinnacperformplus
      3) Sole SB900
      Read more by following this link -> http://geni.us/solesb900

      The Spinner Rally and Spinner Ride bikes are chain driven with leather pad resistance -> these factors will certainly increase the potential maintenance of these bike.
      Read more about the Spinner Rally by following this link -> http://geni.us/spinnerrally
      Read more about the Spinner Ride by following this link -> http://geni.us/spinnerride

      If you want a bit of extra inspiration you can read our blog article below
      http://groomandstyle.com/peloton-spin-bike-alternatives/

      Hope this helps a bit, please do let us know if you have any additional questions.

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
  48. Hi Lisa,

    I actually ended up getting a refurbished Keiser M3 (for a great price). I discovered that the one I used had the old version of the seat (which I really didn’t like) and that the new update is much better. I also got over not really loving the placement of things. I’ve been trying it out for a week at our gym and ended up really liking it a lot. I’ve been using the Peloton app, which is great! The gym has had them in high use for 3 years and has had no maintenance issues. What really sold me on it was that it is only 83 lbs. in comparison to the 150lbs of most other bikes. This makes a huge difference for moving it up and down stairs around the house.

    It has not been delivered yet, but I’m very excited about it. Do most of your readers love them?
    Susan

    Reply
  49. HI G+S-
    I have been spinning for many years and want to get a home spin option. I’ve tried out the Peloton app and love it and now I’m looking for the perfect bike. Are you familiar with the TechnoGym bike? They got them a year ago at my gym and I LOVE them, but I have not been able to figure out the price (expensive I assume). I’d like to get the same thing or something similar. What I like is the SPD pedals, monitor that tells you cadence and your resistance level, comfortable seat, and easy adjustment. I’m trying to track down a refurbished option, but it hasn’t been going well. Can you reccomend something similar?

    Note that I tried out the Keiser and am prepared to spend a decent amount of money if I really love it, but I did not like that bike. Hated the water bottle placement (that I kept knocking off) and did not like the placement and ease of changing the resistance (easy to bump into). Seat was uncomfortable.
    Thanks,
    Susan

    Reply
    • Hi Susan,

      Thanks for your question. Unfortunately, we have not tried the TechnoGym bikes. It looks like they divide their exercise bikes into 2 main categories; Group Cycling bikes (bikes like the Group Cycle Connect and Group Cycle Ride) and Exercise Bikes (Bike Forma, Artis Bike and Excite Bike). There was one model we found on amazon but this looks like a lower end bike without SPD pedals – although it is still priced quite highly.
      Read more by following this link -> http://geni.us/technogymbike

      We have listed below some alternative high end spin bike / exercise bike options which we have some experience with. The key requirement we used to determine whether or not a spin bike was high end was that it used magnetic resistance, and that it had a belt drive. In a lot of cases consoles come as standard, but some manufacturers offer several models and therefore only provide a console as an upgrade. Seat comfort and SPD pedals are important, but only as a secondary requirement as these items can always be swapped out to suit personal taste. This is similar for water bottles – as in most cases you can find some way to adjust where they are placed, if you are not happy with the standard configuration.

      1) Bodycraft SPR Indoor Group Cycle. Magnetic resistance (16 levels of resistance), belt drive, display (with resistance level, speed, distance, rpm, watt, etc.), fully adjustable seat and handlebar, optional SPD pedals available (about $100 upgrade), high performance racing saddle (saddle can always be swapped out as required), and the water bottle sits at the end of the handlebars (just beyond the console).
      Read more by following this link -> http://geni.us/bodycraftspr

      2) Schwinn ac performance plus with carbon blue belt drive. Magnetic resistance (32 levels of resistance), carbon blue belt drive, optional display as an upgrade (Schwinn MPower Echelon 2 Console with Power Upgrade), fully adjustable seat and handlebar, SPD (and on some models SPD and toe-clip combination), padded seat for comfort (comfort is going to be personal), and the water bottles sits in front of the handlebars.
      Read more by following this link -> http://geni.us/schwinnacperformplus

      3) Sole SB900. Another high quality magnetic resistance bike (multi level turn dial, although resistance is not show on the console), belt drive, basic console included (RPM, heart rate monitor with chest strap purchased separately, chest strap), fully adjustable seat and handlebar, SPD and toe-clip combinations, performance racing saddle (saddle can always be swapped out as required), and the water bottles sits on the handlebars either side of the console.
      Read more by following this link -> http://geni.us/solesb900

      4) You could always just purchase the Peloton Spin Bike… 🙂 Magnetic flywheel, WiFi connectivity, and 21.5-inch HD touchscreen, beams you classes from its New York City studio.
      You might also want to read our article about Peloton Spin Bike Alternatives i.e how you can setup any at home spin bike so you can use the Peloton app, or take part in group rides etc.
      http://groomandstyle.com/peloton-spin-bike-alternatives/

      Good luck with your choice…

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
      • Hi Susan,

        Just checking in to see if our reply helped clarify anything for you?
        Would be curious to know which bike you are leaning towards at this point?

        Kind Regards,
        Lisa and Pierce

        Reply
  50. I love the social aspect of STRAVA to compete with other cyclists! I get on the bike; my headset on, agm x1 (a phone that endurance falls, water, aaaalll) some water … and I lose a few hours in the road ♥

    Reply
  51. Hi
    I am researching spin bikes to use at home. I am looking for a top rated / gym quality bike. I tested the Life Cycle Lifecycle GX bike and liked it. I have found good reviews but I have noticed it is never mentioned on these “best bikes” list. Is there something I am missing about this bike? Is the Keiser considered a better bike?

    Thanks
    Becky

    Reply
    • Hi Becky,

      Thanks for your question. The G+S team has not tested the Life Fitness Lifecycle GX spin bike. If you tested it, liked it, and the bike fitted your frame and you felt that you would get good customer support from Life Fitness, then I doubt you are missing anything.

      Like the Keiser M3iX spin bike the Life Fitness Lifecycle GX:
      – is constructed from a sturdy steel frame, with a special paint to prevent corrosion from sweat etc.
      – fully adjustable seat and handlebards
      – magnetic resistance. The Kaiser has 24 levels and the Lifecycle has 20 different levels of resistance.
      – durable belt drive for quite maintenance free riding
      – dual SPD and toe basket pedals
      – computer console. The Keiser bike computer looks slightly better with the ability to integrate with a fitness app (something like the GoInd App) via bluetooth so you can track and record performance.

      If you feel the lifecycle is right for you then go for it. The G+S team however can fully recommend the Keiser M3i bike (or M3iX) knowing it is an extremely high quality bike backed by a professional and knowledgable support team.

      For those who are interested in reading more about the Life Fitness Lifecycle spin bike you can read more via this link below.
      http://geni.us/spinbikeslifefitness

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
  52. Hello! Can most pedals be replaced with the SPD clips? Or only the Spinner NXT? ‘Thanks!!
    Michelle

    Reply
    • Hi Michelle,
      Yes, in general most are replaceable…but if having SPD’s is important for you then this is something that should be checked for the exact bike you are going to buy.
      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
    • Hi Suzette,

      Thanks for your question.

      Spinner produce the best value range of bikes which have a specified weight capacity of 350lbs. The Spinner Sprint is solidly built (steel frame, chain drive spin bike which is very stable), fully adjustable and comfortable. The bike uses a friction pad on the flywheel to provide the resistance. Follow this link here to get more information of the bike and its costs on amazon.
      http://geni.us/spinbikes8

      The Spinner Sprint does not come with a console but as with most of the Spinner bikes you can add one for about US$100.

      Good luck with the decision.

      Kind Regards,
      Lisa

      Reply
  53. G&S, thank you for taking the time to respond to the great questions posed above. Really appreciate your input and found it extremely helpful for someone who is looking into purchasing a spin bike. Thanks you!

    Reply
  54. Are there any programs or bikes that allow you to participate in live classes the way the Peloton bike and app do? I’ve read a few reviews on the Peloton bike and have some concerns about it so looking for other options.

    Thanks!

    Kate

    Reply
    • Hi Kate,

      We are just in the process of writing an article along these lines i.e. More cost effective Peloton bike alternatives. So please check back in a few days. Effectively, what you can do is to purchase “any” spin bike, then equip the bike with additional speed and cadence sensors, and then subscribe to the peloton app. Stay tuned.

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
      • Hi Kate,
        Here is the article on Peloton Bike Alternatives. The article explains what is needed to setup a budget spin bike for use with the Peloton app. It also talks about the use of the Zwift app, which will let you join Virtual Group Rides in a range of locations – quite a cool concept. We hope you enjoy it.
        http://groomandstyle.com/peloton-spin-bike-alternatives/
        Kind Regards,
        Pierce

        Reply
  55. Hi
    I was considering 3 models which are the bladez echelon, master gs and the stratum and was wondering if you know anything about the spinner bikes and your thoughts? I cant decied which one to get.

    Reply
    • Hi Brock,

      Our team has not tested the Bladez bikes, but looking at some of the reviews online they seem like a reasonable purchase. There do seem to be some negative comments about customer support, but G+S cannot confirm this. As for which one to go for that totally depends on your budget and requirements.

      For the Bladez Fitness Fusion GS II, you are getting:
      a steel framed, fully adjustable (handle and seat horizontal and vertical adjustments), chain drive, felt pad with resistance knob spin bike with a basic console (time is accurate, speed and distance are estimates).
      You can read more on amazon via the link below.
      http://amzn.to/2nvrqh4
      As an alternative G+S would suggest the Sunny SF-B1001 Indoor Cycling Bike, we can vouch for the quality and customer support provided.

      With the Bladez Echelon you are effectively paying more for the belt drive (compared to the Bladez Fitness Fusion GS II) which means less noise and a bit less maintenance.
      You can read more on amazon via the link below.
      http://amzn.to/2osBVqc

      With the Bladez Master you are effectively paying more for a superior bike computer that is compatible with Polar heart rate monitors.
      You can read more on amazon via the link below.
      http://amzn.to/2nNZMh7

      Good luck with the choice.

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
  56. Just wondering – I am looking to purchase the Sunny Health & Fitness SF-B1509 Belt Drive Premium Indoor Cycling Bike and was wondering what is the difference between this one and the two you mentioned above?

    Reply
    • Hi Lorraine,

      Sorry, but I am not 100% sure which bike you were interested in comparing the Sunny Health & Fitness SF-B1509 with. I will start by comparing it with our number 5 budget choice, the Sunny Health & Fitness SF-B1001 – if that does not answer your question then please let us know.

      As these 2 bikes are made by the same company it is reasonably easy to simply compare the features, so:
      Sunny Health & Fitness SF-B1509
      Cost – approximately US$ 399
      Construction – steel frame
      Drive type – chain drive (chain drives are typically a bit more work to maintain and noisier than belt drive bikes)
      Flywheel – 30lbs
      Adjustments – seat and handlebars can be adjusted horizontally and vertically
      Pedals – dual action SPD pedals
      Resistance – pressure pad

      Sunny Health & Fitness SF-B1001
      Cost – approximately US$ 200
      Construction – steel frame
      Flywheel – 40lbs
      Adjustments – seat can be adjusted horizontally and vertically and handlebars can be adjusted vertically
      Pedals – foot cages
      Resistance – pressure pad

      If you were curious about the difference between the SF-B1509 and the Bodycraft SPR and Keiser M3i bikes, then the differences are quite significant. For the significant jump in cost for the SF-B1509 to the Bodycraft SPR and Keiser M3i bikes you are getting vastly superior bikes. The major difference is that you are paying for a more durable bike with magnetic resistance (rather than pressure pads).

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
  57. Just curious why the Bodycraft SPR isn’t included in this reviews (or almost any other review for that matter). It seems to me to be a great option. The street price is a few hundred less than the Keiser. It has a much heavier flywheel than the Keiser which should help with the biggest negative I’ve read about it. It has magnetic resistance, belt drive, and a console that displays watts, rpm, cadence, speed, distance, and resistance. The resistance display seems like a pretty big option since it is one of the only bikes (other than Keiser) that displays it in an objective (repeatable) manner.

    I’m in no way affiliated with them, I’ve just been researching bikes ever since my wife fell in love with the Peloton at a hotel gym last month. The Bodycraft SPR seems like just about a perfect alternative – but there are almost never any reviews of it. I’ve also considered one of the Sunny models and adding cadence/speed sensors. That would also leave the option of adding some BePro pedals down the line if we wanted power. I just really like the idea of being able to have an objective measure of resistance.

    Reply
    • Hi Chris,

      Very good point, the Bodycraft SPR (not the SPT or SPX models which use resistance pads rather than a magnetic system to control resistance) is another high quality spin bike. For those readers who want some more information please see details below.

      As Chris has mentioned the Bodycraft SPR is quite similar to the Keiser M3i and therefore it is easiest to use the Keiser bike as a point of reference.

      The Bodycraft SPR and Keiser M3i:
      – are both made from a steel frame with protective painted coatings to prevent corrosion from excessive sweat
      – are actually quite similar in price
      – body utilise the eddy current magnetic system, the Keiser M3i has 24 levels of adjustment and the Bodycraft SPR has 16 levels. Resistance adjustments on both bikes are via a simple lever, and on both bikes the resistance level is immediately reflected via the attached computer
      – both bikes have a durable belt drive that is very smooth and quiet
      – both bikes offer a great range of adjustments with seats and handlebars moving horizontally and vertically
      – As mentioned by Chris one of the biggest differences is that the Keiser has the 8lbs flywheel and the Bodycraft SPR has a 38lbs flywheel. In the article above G+S discuss the fact that some experts feel that a lighter flywheel is disadvantageous to beginner cyclists as they can develop an up and down peddle stroke. Whereas a heavier perimeter weighted flywheel can help propel the legs through the full 360 cycling motion.
      – The keiser M3i has the technological advantage in that the computer is bluetooth enabled and users are able to record their workouts on their mobile devices via the free GOInd app.

      Unfortunately, the Bodycraft SPR is not available on amazon at the moment but for those who want to investigate further they can follow the link here
      http://amzn.to/2neZcbL (note G+S do not recommend the Bodycraft SPT or SPX models as they use resistance pads rather than the eddy current magnetic system).

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
    • Hi Autumn,

      The peloton spin bike is a great offering for those who can afford it. G+S just feel that there are better value spin bikes out there, and cheaper ways to obtain similar or better quality functionality.

      A rundown of the peloton spin bike for your information:

      Drive Train – the peloton is built with a smooth and quiet Groove Poly V belt drive that has the potential to stretch over time (the belt drive is not reinforced with carbon like on the Schwinn AC performance bike so it can stretch)

      Resistance – High quality 6-Magnet brake design that enables very smooth and consistent control. This type of design (used on the Keiser M3 and the Schwinn AC performance Plus i.e. most top end spin bike) is more durable and requires less maintenance that a traditional brake pad system.

      User Specifications – Minimum height is 4’11” and Maximum Height is 6’8″ with maximum weight of 305 pounds
      Handlebar design – is nice but limited compared to the likes of the Keiser M3 and the beautiful designed handlebars on the Schwinn AC performance Plus. There are no forward or aft adjustments (horizontal movement) which means it can be tricky for some riders to find the “perfect” position.
      Seat Adjustments – both horizontal and vertical adjustments

      Durability of design – The peloton is made with a steel frame with an entry level steel bottom bracket (for example the Schwinn AC performance plus uses a heavy duty bottom bracket that is twice the size and durability). The bottom bracket on a spin bike is effectively the part that connects the peddles through the bike. Therefore, having a durable bottom bracket is key to the bikes durability

      Warranty – the Peloton is a non-commercial grade bike i.e. a residential grade bike and comes with a 5 year frame and 1 year on parts. This is compared to the Keiser and Schwinn bikes that come with a 10 year frame warranty and 2 year part warranty.

      Features – the peloton obviously comes with the beautiful attached Android screen which is the key selling feature of this bike. For those who are not aware this screen allows you to stream on demand classes (you cannot surf the web with the android screen). With other bikes like the Keiser or Schwinn you can utilise your own iPad and subscribe to the Peloton app if you want (setup does require a bit of work but doing this yourself means you are not “tied” to the peloton infrastructure).

      Pedals – Cycling shoes are needed with the Peloton bike (i.e. you cannot just wear trainers) as Look style cleats pedals come standard with the bike

      The all important costs of the peloton setup – Bike cost + tax and shipping is US$1995, US$250 required build fee, plus the yearly class subscription of £39 a month (£469 a year). So the minimum cost for the year is about US$2700.

      Overall we would say the Peloton bike is a great product for those who have the money and love the idea of the Peloton screen, classes and infrastructure. However, for those who want some value for money there are better bikes out there such as the Kaiser and Schwinn bikes which with a bit of “effort” can also be setup to use the Peloton or similar online classes.

      Hope this helps a bit.

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
  58. My inseam is 24 inches and I am 5 feet tall. I have had two ankle surgeries from a bone issue and running is no longer an option. I am considering indoor cycling, but doing this in an ergonomical way seems impossible. What is the best fit for an indoor cycle for someone with a short inseam? My regular bicycle is a 14 inch frame, but weather doesn’t always permit it.
    Kel

    Reply
    • Hey Kel,

      Sorry to hear about the ankle surgeries – that must have been quite painful. I think there should be some spin bike options out there for you. We have updated our guide to include the “Minimum and Maximum Height for end user” and “Adjustability” information on whether or not the seat and handlebars can be moved vertically or horizontally. Hopefully with this information you can start to work out which bike might work for you. Depending on your budget you have the option of the Keiser M3 Plus, Spinner NXT or Sunny SF-B1001.

      You might also want to consider recumbent exercise bike – not sure if the reclined position would help reduce the pressure on your ankles at all?
      http://groomandstyle.com/top-5-best-recumbent-exercise-bike-reviews/

      Good luck with the research.

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
  59. Interesting article but I have to agree with Lucas. I feel Keiser was left behind and quite unfortunate as I have used both bikes and quite often.

    Kieser machines are useful for the gears as they give you a point of progression with the numbers. The digital display offers RPM, WATTS, calories and mileage which is great as they give you bench marks to compete against for your next ride. Overall ride is relatively comfortable but I feel as if the resistance feels a little unnatural. The water bottle holder between the legs is a pain as it does a poor job of holding anything.

    Scwhin offers an excellent bike in the AC performance line. I feel this bike is a bit more polished overall with a more natural ride position and the resistance is more on par when sprinting compared to the Keiser machine. Water bottle holder is in a better position and handlebar offers a wider variety of hand positions.

    As far as maintenance goes I can attest to neither as I just ride. If you’re looking for best value overall I fell Schwinn beats out Keiser as far as price and functionality. Keiser IMO has one overall advantage and that comes with the gears and knowing the resistance with RPM based spin classes. This is an excellent function as you always know your level of effort compared to RPM.

    Reply
    • Hi Lance,

      Thanks very much for the comment.

      For those readers who want to consider the Schwinn AC performance plus, they can do some more investigation via the amazon link below.
      http://amzn.to/2mS7sQP

      We will also update the article once we have a chance to trial the Schwinn AC performance plus.

      Kind Regards,
      Pierce

      Reply
  60. Is the Sunny SF-B1001 Indoor Cycling Bike better than the Sunny Health & Fitne​ss Pro Indoor Cycling Bike? I have been looking at the Sunny health brand because it seems to be affordable although I love the Peloton (especially since it comes with a screen to stream classes) just can’t spend that much. It seems like any bike that has the built in ability to stream classes is out of my price range. I need to get back into shape and looking for something to put in my office because I want to cut gym costs and find something fun to do at home. I use to do spin classes and it was a lot of fun and kicked my butt. Also are there any good adroid apps for spin classes? I think Peloton app is like $15-20 a class?

    Reply
    • Hi Loretta,

      Thanks for the great questions. Hopefully, the following will help.

      The Sunny SF-B1001 and Sunny SF-B901 are “essentially” the same bike. The SF-B1001 is designed for smaller people and the SF-B901 is for larger people. See a few of the key specs below (so it is likely you can save yourself a few $’s and buy the SF-B1001). You can then use the extra money to set yourself up with a good cadence/speed monitor and training app.

      SF-B1001
      Flywheel weight – 30lbs
      Max User weight – 220lbs
      Inseam Adjustment – Min 28in /Max 40in
      SF-B901
      Flywheel weight – 40lbs
      Max User weight – 275lbs
      Inseam Adjustment – Min 28.5in /Max 41in

      To join any “online” spin class first you will need a cadence (and/or speed) monitor for you bike. There are a few options out there but you could start by looking at the products from Wahoo.
      – Wahoo RPM Cadence Sensor for iPhone and Android (just measures cadence)
      http://amzn.to/2kPTIVO
      – Wahoo Blue SC Speed and Cadence Sensor for iPhone and Android
      http://amzn.to/2jZScRL

      Then you can sign up for the free zwift or wahoo app – which will allow you to have your speed and cadence on your android (or iphone).

      If you want to then be inspired by something like the peleton live classes or on demand classes you will need a second device such as an ipad which you can then mount to your spin bike. The costs of the peleton app are $12.99 for the monthly membership or $6 for a one week pass.

      There are competitors to peleton out there such as the https://www.bitgym.com

      Good luck with your decision.

      Kind Regards,
      Lisa and G+S

      Reply
  61. I would recommend a Stages, Schwinn (both belt drives and quiet) or an NXT. Get it sensored with speed and cadence, sign-up for Zwift and get the Peloton app and you are ready to go for hours of sweat and motivation

    Reply
  62. I’m looking for a indoor spin bike that I can put my own routes in. I want to train for different rides in my area. Can you give me a suggestion for a good quality spin bike. I don’t want to spend over 1,500.
    Thank you!
    Janine Moffitt

    Reply
  63. Is there a reason the Schwinn ac performance plus with carbon blue did not make it on this list? I’m truly curious because I’m trying to decide on what to buy for my home gym. I assumed Schwinn would be a top brand but I see a lot of praise for the Keiser. Thanks for the help!

    Reply
    • Hi Lucas,

      Thanks for the great question, the GNS team should probably do a detailed comparison between the 2 – as you pointed out there is not really much between the Keiser and the Schwinn. Both bikes are very high quality. However, the focus of this review was to list spin bikes for a home gym – and the GNS review team felt the Keiser won out in this area (as a gym owner who was looking for bikes the Schwinn might just win out – as it has a chain drive like a real bike). The Keiser, with its belt drive, would require slightly less maintenance over time, is quieter and comes with a console as standard – and with the X-bars you can get a great upper body workout too. At the same time if you were wanting to do longer workout sessions, then the Schwinn might trump all this, as the handlebars are arguably superior – they have a flattened section were you could in theory rest a laptop. In terms of quality and sturdiness of build the bikes are pretty much similar. Hope this helps, good luck with your investigations – let us know what you decide in the end.

      Kind Regards
      Lisa

      Reply

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